Tercet


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Tercet

 

(1) In versification, a stanza consisting of three lines. There are two types of tercet: either all three lines rhyme, or the first two lines rhyme and the third does not. The tercet did not become widely popular. In a narrow sense, the term is used to refer to the three-line part of the sonnet.

(2) In music, a group of three performers, usually vocal but occasionally instrumental. A tercet may also be a musical composition for such a vocal group, with or without instrumental accompaniment.

References in periodicals archive ?
Additionally, with the set repetition of the opening phrase in each tercet, and the division of the first and second line into two grammatical parts by way of caesura, Madrid maxes out his opportunities for different kinds of conjunction and disjunction: the second phrase of each tercet's first line sounds like it's elaborating on the repeated first phrase, but it's not always clear how; the second line seems like it's adding objects and ideas to the picture; and the third seems to extend to a kind of meta-comment on everything that's preceded, sometimes on the act of poetry itself.
This last tercet not only ironizes the contrast between Garcilaso's name and the adjective "lasso," (38) but establishes one between "larga istoria" and "corta vida"-a contrast that he, Boscan, will endeavor to maintain after Garcilaso's death by publishing his poetry.
In this light, the final tercet that refers to the Queen as "suspirada y bella" (13) must be read ironically, representing what both Maria Luisa and Goya hoped to convey, but which is undercut by the Queen's unattractive visage.
However, if, as I suspect, the driving force of the sonnet is to call attention to the poor and unseemly ultimate resting place of the painter, and the irony of these circumstances given his greatness, the tercet also may be read on another level.
The quartets are the same or very similar to those in this edition, but the tercets are different, at least that which is legible.
In the final tercet, the poet chooses not to use the simple past (I saw adulthood) but instead crafts a complex temporal landscape that hinges on a particular temporal location, "that day," in which a traversing of worlds was possible.
Petrarch finalizes his self-aggrandizement in the closing tercet of the sonnet where we encounter his explicit advice to the lovelorn Gianfigliazzi:
See, for example, the final tercet of "Sonnet Eight.
Cervantes's direct familiarity with such language is beyond dispute, since he provided Barros with a laudatory sonnet whose first tercet reads: "El que navega por golfo insano / del mar de pretensiones vera al punto / del cortesano laberinto el hilo" (1: 6r [vv.
Thus in the first tercet of sonnet 1, immediately after the poet's claim to write "a l'aventure" and just before the designation of the Regrets as "de papiers journaulx," the reader comes across the following programmatic statement:
With that in mind, let us turn to an example of what we might call the textuality and contexts of the Rimbaldian body--its politics, its poetics, and its base, potentially comic ungovernability--and its crucial semiotic function in the final tercet of Arthur Rimbaud's "Les Effares.
La ligne "Trompette tout haut d'or pame sur les velins" dans le dernier tercet du sonnet dedie a Richard Wagner aussi bien que "L'or de la trompette d'ete" de la Prose font echo a cette analogie dans Igitur entre le cor d'or, le corridor, la trompette, et le miroir assimiles aux pages de velin refletant les cendres des genies decedes.