Tercet


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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Tercet

 

(1) In versification, a stanza consisting of three lines. There are two types of tercet: either all three lines rhyme, or the first two lines rhyme and the third does not. The tercet did not become widely popular. In a narrow sense, the term is used to refer to the three-line part of the sonnet.

(2) In music, a group of three performers, usually vocal but occasionally instrumental. A tercet may also be a musical composition for such a vocal group, with or without instrumental accompaniment.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The first two tercets constitute two paratactic subject-predicate structures, each comprising a condition, an action, and an object of that action, which has also been affected by the prior condition.
Pushkin's free use of variations on the word "desire" throughout the poem ("zhelal" appears twice in the first and second quatrain, "zhelaniia" in the final tercet) is later sharply contrasted with the chaste qualities of the Madonna ("Prechistaia" appears in the second quatrain; "chisteishii" twice in the final tercet).
Next comes a sentence running through six tercets with a parallel assertion, and then a single tercet at the end doing the same thing.
She reveals the meaning of her allusions (Apollo, flames, and flight into the sky) in the opening of the first tercet. She speaks of her newfound audacity that makes her "like Phaeton" (9).
He even uses alliteration and verbal repetition to convey his message: the second tercet repeats three times the syllable 'ver', hidden in 'verdades', 'tiverdes' and 'versos'.
The themes of the octave are taken up immediately and varied in the first tercet in which the human, personal favour ("durch welcher Gunst") is intensified by the divine favour ("Dess frommen Himmels-Gunst") enjoyed by the Russian empire.
This interplay between the existential and the religious comes to the fore in the last tercet: "Christ minds [...] / [...] eyes them, heart wants, care haunts, foot follows kind, / Their ransom, their rescue, and first, fast, last friend" (12-14).
La gradation, de la description de la beaute du lieu du premier quatrain, a l'acrete du dernier tercet, est toutefois a elle seule tres eloquente:
Another scholar seems to skip over Yeats entirely (though his own phrasing echoes line 1 of "Lapis Lazuli"), seeing the "Grave men/blind" tercet (which contains the injunction to "be gay") as "perhaps invok[ing] the Miltonic" (Tindall also mentions Milton 205) and the effect of the phrase "be gay" as "rather hysterical sentimentality" (Holbrook, Dissociation 53); of the earlier "Wise men/lightning" verse, however, he says "The images are merely there, histrionically, to bring in the phrase `forked no lightning' to give a Lear-like grandeur to the dirge" (52).
As arranged in The Dynasts the lines that form 'The Eve of Waterloo' in Selected Poems are no lyric, nor are they singly voiced: twelve tercets are distributed between 'The Chorus of the Years' and 'The Chorus of the Pites', and a final tercet is given to the 'Chorus of Sinister Spirits'.
Although the last two lines rhyme (albeit imperfectly), they are not a separate couplet, being structurally part of a concluding unit of three lines, a tercet formed by parentheses:
tercet or tiercetFrench tercet, from Middle French tiercet, from Italian terzetto, a derivative of terzo third