shipworm

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shipworm

or

teredo

(tĕrē`dō), marine bivalvebivalve,
aquatic mollusk of the class Pelecypoda ("hatchet-foot") or Bivalvia, with a laterally compressed body and a shell consisting of two valves, or movable pieces, hinged by an elastic ligament.
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 mollusk of the family Teredinidae, specialized for boring in wood. A shipworm is not a worm, but a greatly elongated clamclam,
common name for certain bivalve mollusks, especially for marine species that live buried in mud or sand and have valves (the two pieces of the shell) of equal size.
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. Its two shells, enclosing only the front end of the body, function as a tool, rather than a protective covering; their ridged and roughened surfaces are used for boring. The burrow (lined with a calcareous coating produced by the clam's mantle) is begun when the animal is in its larval stage and is expanded as it grows. The common shipworm of the North Atlantic Ocean, Teredo navalis, may grow up to 2 ft (60 cm) long, although its shells remain only 1-2 in. (12 mm) long. Shipworms feed on wood particles and minute organisms. They do enormous damage to piers and ships, and although they are deterred by chemicals, control is still a problem. Shipworms are classified in the phylum MolluscaMollusca
, taxonomic name for the one of the largest phyla of invertebrate animals (Arthropoda is the largest) comprising more than 50,000 living mollusk species and about 35,000 fossil species dating back to the Cambrian period.
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, class Pelecypoda or Bivalvia, order Eulamellibranchia, family Teredinidae.
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shipworm

[′ship‚wərm]
(invertebrate zoology)
Any of several bivalve mollusk species belonging to the family Teredinidae and which superficially resemble earthworms because the two valves are reduced to a pair of plates at the anterior of the animal or are used for boring into wood.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Larvae of Bankia gouldi can also be distinguished from those of Teredo navalis by the length of the posterior provincular tooth of the left valve (6.4 [+ or -] 0.6 [micro]m, n = 7) (Fig.
Physiological and biochemical energetics of larvae of Teredo navalis and Bankia gouldi.
Teredo navalis, the shipworm most prevalent in temperate regions of North America, averages 6 to 8 in.
Growth, morphometry and biochemical composition of the wood boring molluscs Teredo navalis L., Bankia gouldi (Bartsch).
The species Cyrtopleura costata and the two wood-boring bivalves, Bankia gouldi and Teredo navalis, represent the families Pholadidae and Teredinidae, respectively (Figs.