Tereus


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Related to Tereus: Procne, Philomela

Tereus

(tēr`ēəs): see Philomela and ProcnePhilomela and Procne
, in Greek mythology, daughters of King Pandion of Attica. Procne married Tereus, king of Thrace, and bore him a son, Itys (or Itylus). Tereus later seduced Philomela and cut out her tongue to silence her.
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Tereus

wife Procne murders son Itys and serves him to Tereus. [Gk. Myth.: Howe, 144]

Tereus

cuts off Philomela’s tongue to prevent her telling he has raped her. [Gk. Myth.: Benét, 995]
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Legend of Philomela begins by addressing God the giver of forms, asking him "[w]hy madest thow, unto the slaunder of man" (2231), "[w]hi sufferest thow that Tereus was bore" (2234).
Only the male sings, as Tereus does, attempting to woo Philomela with words.
Marcus almost immediately recognizes the ramifications of Lavinia's "ravished" appearance, lamenting that "some Tereus hath deflowered thee, /And, lest thou shouldst detect him, cut thy tongue" (Shakespeare 1997b, 2.4.26-27).
Petrarch's sonnet 310 positions "pianger Filomena" ["weeping Philomena"] and "garrir Procne" ["chattering Procne"] (3), (34) as harbingers of spring, invoking the section from Ovid's Metamorphoses in which sisters are transformed into a nightingale and a swallow after wreaking vengeance on Tereus, who betrayed one by raping the other and cutting out her tongue in a failed effort to keep the act secret.
tereus - + - - Cladosporium + + - - cladosporioides Drechslera halodes + + + + Fusarium oxysporum + + + + Penicillium chrysogenum - - - - Sterile mycelium (white) + + + + Fungi identified Kersa Sack ID 60 120 180 Aspergillus flavus + + + + A.
This is the most brutally violent tale in all of Metamorphoses, the story of Tereus, Procne, and Philomela.
Euelpides and Peisetairos have birds (a jackdaw and a crow) bought from a named Athenian market-trader chained to their wrists, yet purchased with a view to finding, and getting advice from, the mythical character Tereus (13-15).
On a mythological plane, both story lines--though with varying degrees of lucidity--are projected against Ovid's 'archetypal' narrative about Philomela, Tereus, and Procne and through it linked to the crucial theme of transformation in the process of creation, and to that of submission, inward and outward, to spatial, temporal, and personal realities.
The image of Nerval's tour abolie, if it were to be taken as a tarot card symbolizing the Tower of Babel, along with a reference to the metamorphosis of Philomela (mythical daughter of the Athenian king) into a swallow after she is raped and has her tongue cut off by king Tereus of Thrace, further highlights the breakdown of understanding amongst people as a result of the collapse of linguistic unity.
126, and Maria Bullon-Fernandez on the parallel English, Portuguese, and Castilian versions of Gower's 'Tale of Tereus'.
This mother-child relationship is mirrored in the sixth poem in Silenus' songs about Scylla, the daughter of Nisus, and the banquet Philomela presented to Tereus, though these examples represent the darker side of parent-child relationships.
(14.) When I first shared the story of Bunita's quartet with musicologist Suzanne Cusick, she immediately compared it to the ancient Greek myth of Philomela, retold in Ovid's Metamorphoses as that of a woman who, after being brutally raped by her brother-in-law, Tereus of Thrace, endures the further trauma of him cutting out her tongue so that she can never speak what she knows.