Terrigenous Components

Terrigenous Components

 

(also clastic, allogenic, or relict components), the constituents of sedimentary rocks; rock fragments and mineral grains of various sizes that have been eroded from land areas and carried to zones of sedimentation. They are genetically distinct from other constituents of sediment or rock, which are precipitated from solutions or formed in the process of transformations of the sediment. (SeeDIAGENESIS.)

References in periodicals archive ?
They found that the large ion lithophile and light rare earth elements, especially K, Rb, Pb, Th, U, Zr and Nb correlated positively with terrigenous components, such as mica, rutile, tourmaline and zircon and with the maturity index of a sedimentary rock, while ferromagnesian elements Fe, Ti, Mn, Se and V and small cations Na, Ca and Sr correlates positively with chemically unstable components such as volcanic lithic, epidote and feldspar.
Elements which show no systematic variations with SiO2 or Al2O3 content reflect minor compositional differences in common terrigenous components and/or external factors such as biogenic input or secondary alteration processes.
The P/Ti ratio reflects excessive phosphorous delivery to the sea-bottom not supported by terrigenous components. For this reason, an increase in the P/Ti ratio implies higher phosphorous sedimentation to the sea-bottom from biological processes (Latimer and Filippelli, 2001; Flores et al., 2005; Sen et al., 2008; Reolid et al, 2012).
MgO-rich rocks have usually also more terrigenous components, but still rocks with values less than 25% (in Russian literature often classified as clayey or argillaceous limestones or dolomites) are predominating.