Teshuvah

Teshuvah

September-October; during the month of Tishri between Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur
The ten days between Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur are known to Jews as Aseret Yemey Tushuvah, or Ten Days of Penitence . They are a time for reflection, introspection, and repentance, during which people apologize to one another for any wrongs they may have committed during the previous year. The Hebrew word teshuvah means "turning." According to tradition, an unfavorable verdict about one's behavior may be changed by repentance and charity. Each day the famous prayer of confession, which begins "Our Father, our King," is recited at the service in the temple.
In Palestine, pilgrimages are made during this period to the tomb of Rachel and other sacred burial places, as well as to the graves of relatives. In other countries, it is customary to visit the local cemetery. No weddings or banquets may be held during these days, and scholarly Jews spend their time reading and studying the sacred books.
The atmosphere during this time is not one of sadness but of thoughtfulness and kindness. Jews often greet one another by saying, Gemar Hatimah Tovah, which means, "May the final verdict be favorable."
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References in periodicals archive ?
Thus began the chazara b'teshuvah movement; the term refers to secular Jews who have "returned" to their faith with a newly observant dedication to strict Orthodoxy, and is interchangeable with the term baal teshuvah, used more widely in the United States.
Cohen has resigned as director of the Berman Jewish Policy Archive he founded, and he has said he is doing teshuvah (repentance).
"Song of Teshuvah" presents readers with the original Hebrew text of Oros HaTeshuvah with a new translation into English, as well as expert commentary in English from Rabbi Moshe Weinberger.
The period between Rosh Hashanah -- the Day of Judgment, also the start of the Jewish new year -- and Yom Kippur are known as the 10 days of return/repentance, or teshuvah.
What's more, ba'alei teshuvah ("those who return," meaning individuals who go back to Orthodoxy or become Orthodox for the first time) make up a third of Orthodox Jewry in America.
The rise of religion--for example, in the Ba'al Teshuvah movement in the 1970s--largely in the form of a more diffuse "spirituality" (New Age religion) and its relationship to the political (for example, in the rise of political radicalism, militancy and identity politics in the late 1960s) created conditions for various new forms of cultural life for American Jews.
We know, however, that he saw him as a paramount example of the ba'al teshuvah (a Jew who strays and then returns to tradition), and that he regarded him as a great Jew.
(12) By the time, ten years later, that he completed the Mishneh Torah, Maimonides may already have encountered the name of the philosopher Epicurus, and connected it with the rabbinic term, because in the section entitled Hilkhot Teshuvah 3:8 he again defines the rabbinic term epiqoros as a synonym for heretic, and here he omits the reference to the word's supposedly Aramaic origin.
Maimonides, Mishneh Torah, Sefer ha-Mada', Hilchot Teshuvah, 3:8.
The Rambam writes, "It is a positive Torah commandment to cry out and sound trumpets for every tribulation that faces the community; this is one of the ways to engage in teshuvah, repentance...