test tube

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test tube

1. a cylindrical round-bottomed glass tube open at one end: used in scientific experiments
2. made synthetically in, or as if in, a test tube

Test Tube

 

a tube, usually made of glass, that is sealed at one end; a type of chemical laboratory vessel. Test tubes are used when working with small quantities of a substance.

References in periodicals archive ?
Remove 1 mL of sample from the [10.sup.-1] test tube and place it in the [10.sup.-2] test tube.
"Test tubes of absinthe strongly appeal to under-age drinkers because they get such a high concentration of alcohol at a low price," he said.
The more urine--or other fluid--it takes to change the color in the test tube, the lower the concentration of metals.
"But you can get burned by extrapolating from test tube studies to people," she adds, "because in the body there are so many things that buffer that reaction."
Test tube 1 holds one ml., test tube 2 has two mls., tube 3 has six mls., and tube 4 has three mls.
Constable Chad Coles with the Saskatoon Integrated Drug Unit said in an interview it is unlikely the test tubes are used hi the actual production of crystal methamphetamine.
In another experiment, two test tubes were filled with 5 grams of California worms and two test tubes were filled with distillate water.
After the naphthalene has melted, the test tube is removed from the water and as the liquid cools the temperature at which the solid is reformed is recorded with a thermometer.
Pour ten milliliters of test solution into a test tube. Add a 1/2-centimeter-long sample of toothpaste.
In addition to injection baskets, forced-air drying blows air around the chamber and into each piece of glassware for complete drying, even in narrow-neck items, such as pipettes, volumetrics, flasks and test tubes. The stainless steel washer can fit 37 narrow-necked flasks, 96 pipettes or 1600 test tubes in one wash load and includes a water-proof system.
Both teams of researchers became interested in capsaicin after Japanese researchers reported 5 years ago that the compound killed leukemia cells in test tubes. Similar lab tests by Srivastava's group indicate that capsaicin induces suicide by tumor cells, while O'Kelly and his colleagues found signs that compound stifled cell proliferation in some tests and induced cell suicide in others.
What's more, blood samples from the lifestyle group inhibited the growth of prostate cells in test tubes more than blood from the control group.