Orchitis

(redirected from Testicular pain)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical.
Related to Testicular pain: Chronic testicular pain

Orchitis

 

inflammation of the testis in man. Orchitis usually arises as a complication of an infectious disease, for example, parotitis, influenza, gonorrhea, and typhus, or as a consequence of testicular trauma; when an infectious disease is involved, orchititis is said to arise by a hematogenous route. Orchitis has an acute progression: the testis rapidly enlarges and becomes sensitive, and its surface becomes smooth as a result of exudation in the membranes. The body temperature rises. With hematogenous infection, the epididymis and the vas deferens remain unaltered. Within two to three weeks the symptoms of orchitis usually subside, although in a few cases suppuration and even necrosis of the testis are possible. Chronic orchitis proceeds slowly with few symptoms. Treatment involves rest and the use of analgesics, antibiotics, and a suspensory. When suppuration occurs, the the abscess is lanced. In prolonged, recurring cases of orchitis, the affected testis is removed.

References in periodicals archive ?
A 23-year-old male patient presented to the Emergency Department with intermittent testicular pain of five days' duration in his solitary right testicle.
Orchidopexy is often recommended to prevent testicular necrosis and relieve recurrent testicular pain. (9)
Testicular pain in this condition ranges from mild to severe.
The palpable purpuras, testicular pain, and the high ESR in our case were other clinical clues suggesting a vasculitic process.
The management of acute testicular pain in children and adolescents.
Kirk, "Chronic testicular pain: an overview," European Urology, vol.
A painless testicular mass in a young man is pathognomonic of testicular cancer; nevertheless, the majority of cases present with diffuse testicular pain, swelling, and/or hardness [3].
When a clinical history suggesting an underlying vasculitis is not present in the setting of testicular pain, the diagnosis is a difficult one.
The retroperitoneal hematoma with its compressive effects gives rise to a variety of ambiguous signs and symptoms which include transient lower limb paralysis, testicular pain, anterior thigh pain, urinary tract infection, groin pain, inguinoscrotal mass, swelling of legand rarely as bowel obstruction.
A 52 year old man presented with a one-month history of polyarthritis, fever and testicular pain. On investigation he was found to be Hepatitis C virus (HCV) seropositive.
In the present study, fever was the most common systemic symptom (21 patients, 42%) followed by joint pain (17 patients, 34%), eye involvement (10 patients, 20%) and testicular pain (6 patients, 12%).
Although epididymitis is rare before puberty (Elder, 2011), a review of JD's obtained medical records indicated he had a history of enlarged left epididymis, left testicular pain, and left-sided swelling (hydrocele) at 5 years of age, all consistent with an inflammatory process of unknown etiology.

Full browser ?