Four-Horned Antelope

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Four-Horned Antelope

 

(Tetracerus quadricornis), a ruminant of the family Bovidae. The four-horned antelope is a small, slender animal, with a body length reaching 1 m and a tail length of 10–15 cm. It weighs 15–25 kg. The antelope is the only member of the family Bovidae whose male has four horns—two slightly curved rear horns measuring 8–10 cm long and two straight front horns measuring 2.5–4 cm long. The females are hornless. The body is cinnamon brown, with lighter underparts. The legs are white on the inside; the edges of the snout and the outside of the ears are black.

The four-horned antelope is distributed in India, where it is found in sparse forests and near reservoirs. It lives secretively, in pairs or singly. The diet consists of grass and leafy shrubs. Mating occurs in August, and one to three young are born in January or February. The animal is hunted for its valuable horns.

References in periodicals archive ?
The four-horned antelope (Tetracerus quadricornis de Blainville, 1816) or chowsingha is the smallest solitary Asian herbivore bovid (adult weight 17-22 kg, stands 55-64 cm at the shoulder) endemic to peninsular India and Nepal (Leslie & Sharma 2009); lives in undulating and hilly terrain (Prater 1980, Baskaran et al.
2011: Behavioural ecology of four-horned antelope (Tetracerus quadricornis De Blainville, 1816) in the tropical forests of southern India.
2016: Diet of the four-horned antelope Tetracerus quadricornis (De Blainville, 1816) in the Churia hills of Nepal.
2009: Tetracerus quadricornis (Aritiodactyla: Bovidae).
2008: Tetracerus quadricornis. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species, e.T21661A9307713.
2014: Habitat preference of four-horned antelope (Chowsingha), Tetracerus quadricornis in Kumbhalgarh Wildlife Sanctuary, Rajasthan.
2015: A note on the behaviour of four-horned antelope Tetracerus quadricornis de Blainville, 1816 (Mammalia: Cetartiodactyla: Bovidae) in lowland Nepal.
2016: Predicting potential distribution of poorly known species with small database: the case of four-horned antelope Tetracerus quadricornis on the Indian subcontinent.
They probably became extinct in Africa at the end of the Miocene (Bibi, 2007) and today they are only restricted to Asia with two living species: large Boselaphus tragocamelus and small Tetracerus quadricornis.
The molar differs from that of Tetracerus quadricornis (de Blainville, 1816) in the absence of post-interlobe.
Tetracerus quadricornis has been omitted from all of the scratch width comparisons until more is known about the circumstances behind the remarkable widths of its microwear scratches).
Common ungulate prey species of tigers in Pench are chital (Axis axis), sambar (Cervus unicolor), nilgat (Boselephas tragocamelus), gaur (Bos gaurus), wild pig (Sus scrofa), muntjac (Muntiacus muntjac), and four-horned antelope (Tetracerus quadricornis).