tetrachloroethylene

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tetrachloroethylene

[¦te·trə¦klȯr·ō′eth·ə‚lēn]
(organic chemistry)
References in periodicals archive ?
G., and Coauthors, 2006: Global trends, seasonal cycles, and European emissions of dichloromethane, trichloroethene, and tetrachloroethene from the AGAGE observations at Mace Head, Ireland, and Cape Grim, Tasmania.
Mutagenicity of tetrachloroethene in the Ames test: metabolic activation by conjugation with glutathione.
Tetrachloroethene (CAS number: 127-18-4; synonyms: tetrachloroethylene, perchloroethylene, PER, PCE) is a volatile solvent widely used in various technical processes and as an intermediate in the chemical industry [2].
She is today a driving force in a university researcher/environmental consulting company collaboration that has taken the snake oil and pixie dust out of bioaugmentation in which naturally existing microbes are applied to the degradation of tetrachloroethene (PCE) and trichloroethene (TCE).
A survey of drinking-water in the USA in 1976-1977 detected tetrachloroethene in nine of 105 samples at levels ranging from 0.2 to 3.1 mg L-1 (mean 0.81 mg L-1) (EPA, 1980).
L., 2000, "Biologically Enhanced Dissolution of Tetrachloroethene DNAPL," Environ.
Greenpeace has found chemicals such as carbon tetrachloride, chloroform, trichloroethene, tetrachloroethene, and dichlorobenzene, in concentrations ranging from five to 600 times the safety limits.
The starting point for this theory was their discovery in the south of Russia and South Africa that microbial processes in present-day salt lakes naturally produce and emit highly volatile halocarbons such as chloroform, trichloroethene, and tetrachloroethene.
But there is little if any propane or tetrachloroethene, substances that would betray an industrial origin.
In a similar manner, high sulphate concentrations in groundwater can hinder the natural anaerobic biodegradation of chlorinated solvents such as trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethene. Many organic compounds contain sulphur as sulphate, sulfonate, or sulfide.
Soil and ground water monitoring in 1989 and again in the 1990's disclosed metals including lead, silver, copper, nickel and zinc in the soil samples, and certain VOCs, including trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethene were detected in the ground water samples.
After reviewing records and inspections conducted in 2006, DEP determined that the company failed to notify the agency of a release of Tetrachloroethene found at its location, failed to comply with operational requirements for its dry cleaning machine, and discharged industrial wastewater (washing machine wastewater) into a storm drain without approval from DEP or the U.S.