tetrachloroethylene

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Related to Tetrachloroethene: perchloroethylene, trichloroethane, tetrachloroethane, trichloroethene

tetrachloroethylene

[¦te·trə¦klȯr·ō′eth·ə‚lēn]
(organic chemistry)
References in periodicals archive ?
Of the compounds found in groundwater, naphthalene, tetrachloroethene and 1,1,1-trichloroethane also were found in the leach tests.
Tetrachloroethene and 3-chlorebenzoate activities are co-induced in Desulfomonile tiedjei DCB-1.
Stimulation of reductive dechlorination of tetrachloroethene in anaerobic aquifer microcosms by addition of short-chain organic acids or alcohols.
Progress Report: Improving Human Health Risk Assessment for Tetrachloroethene by Using Biomarkers and Neurobehavioral Testing in Diverse Residential Populations.
Reductive dechlorination of high concentrations of tetrachloroethene to ethene by an anaerobic enrichment culture in the absence of methanogenesis.
Mutagenicity of tetrachloroethene in the Ames test: metabolic activation by conjugation with glutathione.
She is today a driving force in a university researcher/environmental consulting company collaboration that has taken the snake oil and pixie dust out of bioaugmentation in which naturally existing microbes are applied to the degradation of tetrachloroethene (PCE) and trichloroethene (TCE).
2000, "Biologically Enhanced Dissolution of Tetrachloroethene DNAPL," Environ.
Greenpeace has found chemicals such as carbon tetrachloride, chloroform, trichloroethene, tetrachloroethene, and dichlorobenzene, in concentrations ranging from five to 600 times the safety limits.
The starting point for this theory was their discovery in the south of Russia and South Africa that microbial processes in present-day salt lakes naturally produce and emit highly volatile halocarbons such as chloroform, trichloroethene, and tetrachloroethene.
But there is little if any propane or tetrachloroethene, substances that would betray an industrial origin.
In a similar manner, high sulphate concentrations in groundwater can hinder the natural anaerobic biodegradation of chlorinated solvents such as trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethene.