Tetraodontiformes

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Tetraodontiformes

[¦te·trə·ō‚dänt·ə′fȯr‚mēz]
(vertebrate zoology)
An order of specialized teleost fishes that includes the triggerfishes, puffers, trunkfishes, and ocean sunfishes.

Tetraodontiformes

 

an order of bony fishes. The bones of the upper jaw are firmly joined together or fused. The teeth form a strong beak. The body, which varies greatly in shape, ranges in length from 4 cm (Triacanthadidae) to 2.5 m or more (ocean sunfish). The scales have been converted into spines or scutes. Some species, including the porcupinefish and the puffer, have a special abdominal outgrowth filled with water or air that inflates the entire body when attacked by a predator.

The order Tetraodontiformes has four suborders: Balistoidei, Ostraciontoidei, Tetrodontoidei, and Moloidei. There are 11 families, with about 100 species, distributed in all oceans in tropical and subtropical coastal and open waters; only a few species occur in fresh waters. The fishes feed on bottom invertebrates, specifically, reef-forming coral polyps, pelagic crustaceans, squid, and various fishes. Their diet occasionally includes algae. Many species of the family Balistidae and the suborder Tetrodon-toidei are toxic, because tetrodotoxin is present in the skin, peritoneum, liver, and gonads. However, the meat of these fishes is highly valued in many countries.

A. P. ANDRIIASHEV and A. V. NEELOV

References in periodicals archive ?
A phylogeny of the families of fossil and extant tetraodontiform fishes (Acanthomorpha, Tetraodontiformes), Upper Cretaceous to Recent.
Evolution of motor patterns in tetraodontiform fishes: does muscle duplication lead to functional diversification?
Flyingfishes, epipelagic cephalopods, tetraodontiform fishes, several mesopelagic fishes, Auxis spp.
However, at least two additional behaviors, "water blowing" and "coughing," are widespread in tetraodontiform taxa and show striking functional similarities with inflation.
Several tetraodontiform taxa blow strong jets of water out of their mouth and use the flowing water to manipulate their environment.
We have noted coughing behavior in members of all tetraodontiform lineages that we have observed in captivity.
This would suggest that the similarities between the behaviors are superficial and that water blowing and inflation represent unrelated acquisition within tetraodontiform fishes.
For the structural analysis, we relied heavily on previous work with tetraodontiform fishes (Tyler 1968, 1980; Winterbottom 1974a,b; Turingan and Wainwright 1993; Wainwright and Turingan 1993; Brainerd 1994; Wainwright et al.
The patterns of muscle contraction used during the various buccal compression behaviors were studied in six species, including five tetraodontiform taxa and one outgroup species.
The skeletal and muscular morphology of tetraodontiform fishes have been described in comprehensive detail by Tyler (1968, 1980) and Winterbottom (1971, 1974a), respectively.
Ecomorphological relationships among Caribbean tetraodontiform fishes.