Tetum

(redirected from Tetun)

Tetum

 

(or Belu), a people inhabiting the island of Timor. The Tetum, who number more than 400,000 (1970, estimate), speak a language of the Ambonese-Timor subgroup of the Indonesian languages. They profess Catholicism and Islam, although ancestor worship has been preserved. The Tetum appeared on Timor not earlier than the 14th century. The main forms of their economy are land cultivation, livestock raising, and handicrafts. The Tetum live in pile dwellings. Together with developing capitalist relations, elements of feudal and communal-clan relations are preserved in the social structure of the Tetum.

REFERENCE

Narody Iugo-Vostochnoi Azii. Moscow, 1966.
References in periodicals archive ?
Tenders are invited for community social intervention of the district of tetun
(2) Segun la entrada N de Wikipedia, se utiliza la letra n en los siguientes idiomas: asturiano; aimara; breton; bubi; gallego; chamorro; mapuche; filipino; quechua; inupiaq; guarani; otomi; mixteco; kiliwa; o'odham; papiamento; rohingya; tagalo; tartaro de Crimea; tetun; wolof y zapoteco.
In some ways, they made for unlikely independence activists, as well as Meto and Tetun they spoke the same vernacular of Bahasa Indonesia that could be heard in any dusty market in the archipelago's impoverished east.
Tetun is the lingua franca, or 'vehicular language', of central and most of eastern Timor, and may have been historically associated with advanced (from a European perspective) forms of culture and societal organization (Thomaz 1981).
The Timor-Leste Coffee Association (Assosiasaun Cafe Timor-Leste-ACTL-in Tetun) will be formally registered this year with the vision of becoming a voluntary association of members, working together for the Timor-Leste coffee industry in order to increase the volume, and improve the value of coffees sold for export and domestic consumption.
The book begins with a glossary of acronyms, Tetun and Portugeuse terminology, and a map of the area.
Unfortunately, these emails are in Tetun (national language of Timor Leste) and the readers consequently fail to appreciate better Maun Nando's love for his son.
Research instruments, including the survey (GEM statements), as well as individual indepth interviews (IDI) and focus group discussion (FGD) questions were translated into Tetun, the most commonly used language in Timor-Leste.
With two official languages (Tetun and Portuguese) and two working languages (Bahasa Indonesian and English) Timor-Leste presents unique linguistic challenges to the staff of the U.S.
For instance, in the 'give' constructions of Kemak and Tetun, two Austronesian languages that have had a significant impact of Bunaq (see Schapper 2011a, Schapper 2011b, Schapper 2010: 22-25), the T appears unflagged directly following the verb, while R is flagged by a preposition, as in (78) and (79).
Lewis, Tetun, ETHNOLOGUE: LANGUAGES OF THE WORLD, http://www.ethno logue.com/show_language.asp?code=tet (last visited Feb.