Tewkesbury


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Tewkesbury

(tyo͞oks`bərē), town (1991 pop. 9,454), Gloucestershire, W central England, on the Avon River near its junction with the Severn. Once noted for mustard production, its main industries are boatbuilding, flour milling, and engineering. The site was occupied c.715 by a monastery, refounded in the 12th cent.; it became one of the richest and most widely renowned Benedictine abbeys in England. The church, completed in 1123, is an impressive ruin, with a noteworthy west front. At "Bloody Meadow," south of the town, Edward IV in 1471 defeated the Lancastrians in the Wars of the Roses.
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Tewkesbury

a town in W England, in N Gloucestershire at the confluence of the Rivers Severn and Avon: scene of a decisive battle (1471) of the Wars of the Roses in which the Yorkists defeated the Lancastrians; 12th-century abbey. Pop.: 9978 (2001)
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
great location est Tewkesbury has the largest number of listed buildings in the UK, so a definite must is to follow the trail from the Heritage & Visitor Centre.
Rob McCarthy, CEO, GOSS Interactive adds, “GOSS Interactive is delighted to share in and facilitate the success of Tewkesbury Borough Council in providing informative web content to their customers.
A spokesman for the county's fire brigade said: "The people concerned were using a petrol-powered pump as they had no electricity at the rugby club in Tewkesbury in the past 24 hours but were possibly overcome by fumes from the pump."
Thank goodness, succeeding generations have (on the whole) held back.(3) We have perhaps even less idea of what the temple really looked like when it was finished by Ictinus and Callicrates in the fifth century BC than Scott did of the original state of Tewkesbury Abbey.
Her letter telling the folk of Tewkesbury in Gloucestershire that she could put their town on the map was written on headed PINK notepaper.
The writer of the relevant inked-in notes in Harte's Poems seems to have been John Hart (1755-1800), a turner and chair-maker of Tewkesbury. Male descendants of Shakespeare's sister late in the eighteenth century were by no means illiterate, but they were not well-trained to write.
TEWKESBURY PARK, GLOS WHERE AND WHY Set amongst 163 acres of peaceful Cotswolds parkland, this familyowned luxury spa hotel with golf course is the perfect place to unwind.
IThe Grade II* listed King John's Castle in The Mythe at Tewkesbury, Gloucestershire, doesn't just come with centuries of history, it also carries a title which is transferred from owner to owner - that of Lord of the Manor of Mythe and Mythe Hook.
Located almost at the end of a nothrough lane, King John's Castle sits in an elevated position high above the Severn Vale and in the hamlet of The Mythe, which is situated just north of Tewkesbury and south of the well patronised village of Twyning.
The areas affected are between Malefant Street and Dogfield Street, Dogfield Street and Tewkesbury Street, Tewkesbury Street and Monthermer Road, Hazledene Avenue and Tewkesbury Place, and Tewkesbury Place and Clun Terrace.