Thames


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Thames

(tĕmz), river, c.160 mi (260 km) long, rising NW of Woodstock, S Ont., Canada, and flowing SW past London and Chatham to Lake St. Clair. It is navigable to Chatham, near which was fought (1813) the battle of the Thames (see Thames, battle of theThames, battle of the,
engagement fought on the Thames River near Chatham, Ont. (Oct. 5, 1813), in the War of 1812. Gen. William H. Harrison led an American force of about 3,000 against a British army of approximately 400 regulars commanded by Gen. Henry A.
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) in the War of 1812.

Thames

(tĕmz), Rom. Tamesis, principal river of England, c.210 mi (340 km) long. It rises in four headstreams (the Thames or Isis, Churn, Coln, and Leach) in the Cotswold Hills, E Gloucestershire, and flows generally eastward across S England and through London to the North Sea at The Nore. In its upper course—around and above OxfordOxford,
city (1991 pop. 113,847) and district, county seat of Oxfordshire, S central England. In addition to its importance as the site of the Univ. of Oxford, the city has significant industries, including the manufacture of automobiles and steel products.
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—it is often called Isis. The Thames drains c.5,250 sq mi (13,600 sq km); its tributaries include the Windrush, Cherwell, Thame, Kennet, Wey, Mole, Lea, Roding, and Medway. It is joined by canals (including the Oxford, Thames and Severn, and Grand Junction) that cover a wide area. The river is navigable by barges to Lechlade, below which there are a number of locks. The Thames is tidal to Teddington; there is a 23-ft (7-m) difference between low and high tide at London Bridge. The part of the stream near London Bridge is known as the Pool. The main part of the port of London stretches from London Bridge to Blackwall. The Thames Conservancy Board was established in 1857; the docks and the tidal part of the river below Teddington have been administered by the Port of London Authority since 1908. Part of the river is of great beauty, is much used for boating, and is still popular for fishing. The upper valley of the Thames is a broad, flat basin of alluvial clay soil, through which the river winds and turns constantly in all directions. At Goring Gap the valley narrows, separating the Chiltern Hills from the Berkshire Downs. The lower valley forms a second broad basin through which the Thames also meanders. The land around the river was formerly marshy, and the ancient roads were far from the river banks. In the Middle Ages the valley was very prosperous, with many religious houses and several large towns, including Reading and Windsor. Between Oxford and London, the valley is predominantly agricultural, with scattered villages; Reading is the only industrial town there. The Greater London conurbation along the river's lower course is one of the most important industrial regions of Great Britain. Among the many interesting archaeological discoveries made in the valley are fossils of seashells and a human skull from the Paleolithic period. In London the river is crossed by 27 bridges, including the new London Bridge, Westminster Bridge, Waterloo Bridge, and Tower Bridge. There are two main tunnels under the river in London, and one between Dartford and Purfleet, as well as several footpaths and 5 railroad tunnels. In 1963 governmental efforts began to combat pollution of the waters through a series of rules and regulations. At parts along the river downstream flood barriers were constructed, which became operational in 1982, to prevent London from damage by North Sea gales.

Bibliography

See study by J. Schneer (2005).


Thames

(thāmz), river, c.15 mi (25 km) long, formed by the confluence of the Yantic and Shetucket rivers at Norwich, E Conn., and flowing south to Long Island Sound at New London. Primarily a tidal estuary, it is New London's harbor and the site of the U.S. Coast Guard Academy and a U.S. navy submarine base. Since 1878 it has been the scene of Yale-Harvard rowing contests.

Thames

 

a river in southern Great Britain. The Thames measures 334 km in length and drains an area of 15,300 sq km. It originates in the Cotswolds, flows mainly across the London Basin, and empties into the North Sea, forming an estuary. The width of the Thames within the city limits of London is 200–250 m. The width of the estuary ranges from 650 m near the eastern outskirts of London to 16 km near the mouth of the river. The river is fed by rain. The mean flow rate in the lower course is 260 cu m per sec; the maximum flow rate occurs in winter. Freeze-up occurs only during extremely cold winters.

The lower Thames is subject to tides which rise to a height of 6–6.5 m in London and reach as far as Teddington, where the river channel is dammed. To protect the land adjacent to the Thames from flooding, the river banks are reinforced by dikes in the lower course and estuary and by enbankments in the cities.

The Thames is navigable for almost its entire length. Small barges can reach as far as the city of Lechlade, 311 km from the mouth. Vessels with a water displacement of up to 800 tons can reach London, and oceangoing vessels can reach Tilbury. The cities of London, Oxford, and Reading are situated on the Thames. Below London is the vast Port of London. The Thames is joined by old canals to Bristol Channel, the Irish Sea, and the industrial regions of the central part of the country. The Henley Regatta is regularly held on the river. Below Teddington the Thames is heavily polluted by discharges from numerous industrial enterprises.

A. P. MURANOV

Thames

1. a river in S England, rising in the Cotswolds in several headstreams and flowing generally east through London to the North Sea by a large estuary. Length: 346 km (215 miles)
2. a river in SE Canada, in Ontario, flowing south to London, then southwest to Lake St Clair. Length: 217 km (135 miles)
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LogicaCMG (LSE: LOG), London, U.K., has announced a GBP22 million, seven year IT outsourcing contract win with Thames Water to support their Billing and Income services operation with Dwr Cymru Welsh Water.
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Soloists included Tim and Melanie Hubbard, Jim and Samantha Huff, Greg Thames, and Joel Thames.
Thames heads up a 50-member research team called The Thames Research Group, that among other things, has developed a vegetable-based environmentally-friendly paint that will be used by the U.S.
Not until the sweltering summer of 1858 did the Thames stench, the "Great Stink", drive MPs from their chambers and force their empowering Bazalgette to do something.
Although Thames Trains is currently running bus services between Reading and Newbury during off-peak periods-owing to track repairs being carried out in the wake of the Hatfield rail crash-the company is reinstating its regular service to cater for the Hennessy fixture.
Wild otters were last known to live in the Thames region in the 1970s.
Working with other company executives, Thames Water Managing Director Bill Alexander established a new corporate vision.
The government claimed Thames & Mersey no longer applied because it had been superseded by two U.S.
At a meeting on such agents last month in Washington, D.C., John Sumpter of Brunel University in Uxbridge, England, reported unpublished data on estrogenie breakdown products of detergents commonly found in the Thames and other waterways.
The holiday ale was first produced in 1991, and is "already one of the most popular holiday brews on the market," a Thames America spokesperson reported.