Almagest

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Related to The Almagest: Ptolemy

Almagest:

see PtolemyPtolemy
(Claudius Ptolemaeus), fl. 2d cent. A.D., celebrated Greco-Egyptian mathematician, astronomer, and geographer. He made his observations in Alexandria and was the last great astronomer of ancient times.
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Almagest

(al -mă-jest) (Arabic: the Greatest) an astronomical work compiled by Ptolemy of Alexandria in about ad 140. It was translated from the original Greek into Arabic in the 9th century and became known in Europe when it was translated from Arabic into Latin in the late 12th century. Its 13 volumes cover the whole of astronomy as conceived in ancient times, with a detailed description of the Ptolemaic system of the Solar System. It also included a star catalog giving positions and magnitudes (from 1 to 6) of 1022 stars. This catalog was based mainly on the one produced in the 2nd century bc by Hipparchus of Nicaea.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the first lines of the Almagest, Ptolemy establishes his expertise in philosophy by stating a criterion by which to judge who the legitimate philosophers are.
Paul Kunitzsch, in his life-long study of the Almagest used 40 different manuscripts that contained the whole of the Almagest.
The mathematics in the Almagest is both complex and exquisite and produces a model which is much simpler.
Horrocks realised from viewing the stars,moons and planets that his close observations did not fit the map based on the Almagest, the masterpiece of the second century Alexandrian mathematician Claudius Ptolemaeus (Ptolemy) which was regarded as the astronomers'bible for more than 1,000 years.
degree on 30 May 1570 he read "his ordinaries in the Almagest of Ptolomey"' (DNB, quoting Wood 1815: ii, 310), while `Savile himself gave in act week 1620 the first lectures in geometry [under the aegis of the Chair he had founded[, which were published in 1621, together with some of his earlier mathematical lectures [as] .
However, the last astronomical observation recorded in the Almagest is the one of Mercury on 141 February 2 (Almagest, IX, 7).
Though the Almagest is now widely considered to be the greatest work of Ptolemy, its complicated mathematics and astronomical charts were less appealing to medieval scholars than his Geography (written ca.
The solar model of the Almagest is accepted without change.
1010 Al-Jorjani died; wrote a compendium of the Almagest.
5) The works which I examined then were: 1) Tusi's Tadhkira - the text now studied by both Ragep and Sulaiman - which we know was written in the year 1261 (at least in the first version), as is explicitly stated in many sources; 2) his redaction of the Almagest of Ptolemy, which he called Tahrir al-majisti, also explicitly dated to the year 1247; and finally 3) a short text containing important information about Tusi's most famous mathematical theorem, now called the Tusi Couple, which is called Dhayl-i mu iniya, Sharh-i mu iniya, or even Hall-i mushkilat-i mu iniya - to which we will refer as Dhayl.
No work is without minor blemishes, and since this work will surely be reprinted, I note here the few factual errors that caught my eye: there was no Duke of Ferrara in the fifteenth century (40); Niccolo Perotti is known to have referred to Bessarion's "Academy" as early as 1453-54 (66; see Supplementum Festivum: Studies in Honor of Paul Oskar Kristeller [Binghamton, NY, 1987], 193); Jacopo Cassiano criticized George of Trebizond's commentary on the Almagest, not his translation of the same (77; see my George of Trebizond [Leiden, 1976], 106-08); Heraclides Pontus was the pupil of Plato, not Aristotle (144); and the discussion of the successor of Musurus in the chair at Venice lacks the name of this successor (159).