bard

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bard,

in Wales, term originally used to refer to the order of minstrel-poets who composed and recited the poems that celebrated the feats of Celtic chieftains and warriors. The term bard in present-day usage has become synonymous with poet, particularly a revered poet.

bard

1. 
a. (formerly) one of an ancient Celtic order of poets who recited verses about the exploits, often legendary, of their tribes
b. (in modern times) a poet who wins a verse competition at a Welsh eisteddfod
2. Archaic or literary any poet, esp one who writes lyric or heroic verse or is of national importance
References in periodicals archive ?
2016 is celebrated as the 400th anniversary of the death of the Bard of Avon and it was his sanguine and energetic temperament that made him foresee the world in the past, present and will continue to do so in the future.
Justices Markandey Katju and Gyan Sudha Mishra, made this stinging and insinuating observation in a 12-page order, and quoted the Bard of Avon, William Shakespeare, to boot, to get their message across.
The Bard of Avon shelved a play than didn't make money.
There was predictably good support from Billie Piper, as the dizzy weather girl Hero - "Well, what a lot of weather we have been having recently" - and you could almost sense previously suspicious souls all over the country suddenly warming to the Bard of Avon.
The University of Oregon will kick off its theater season and give a fund-raising campaign a boost Friday with help from the Bard of Avon and a guy from ``Avenue Q.
One of the few occasions when the Bard of Avon is more appropriate than Rabbie.
Anyone who has ever struggled through an exam at school will find welcome relief in this affectionate send-up of the Bard of Avon.
Whoever the Bard of Avon was, his take on the past need not be definitive.
Love that Bard: ``Shakespeare in Love,'' which also comes out on Tuesday, doesn't have as many guns as ``Lock,'' but it has lots of swordplay - in both senses of the way the Bard of Avon used it in his plays.