The Brood


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The Brood

(pop culture)
Introduced by writer Chris Claremont and artist Dave Cockrum in Uncanny X-Men #155 (1982), this extraterrestrial race may remind comics readers of the creatures designed by H. R. Giger for Twentieth Century Fox's Alien blockbuster film series. The Brood resemble gigantic insects, averaging 8 feet in length, with six legs, and with a tail that ends in two stingers. Their large heads seem more reptilian, with rows of sharp teeth. Their thick carapaces serve as armor, and “warrior” Brood have transparent wings, enabling them to fly. Like ants or bees, the Brood organize themselves into a hive-like society, under a queen, which is far larger than any other Brood and is capable of laying eggs. As with another similar race, Star Trek's Borg, the Queen can communicate telepathically with her subjects. Fox's Aliens use humans as hosts for their young, which then burst out from their bodies. Claremont's Broodqueens implant eggs into the bodies of humans or other hosts. But when the egg hatches within the host's body, the embryo takes over the host's body from within, genetically transforming the host into an adult member of the Brood. The Brood member can retain the host's form or change back and forth between the host's form and its Brood form. The Brood member will retain any superhuman powers that its host possessed. No mere animals, the Brood have developed highly advanced science, including the genetic engineering methods they utilized to endow the XMen's ally Carol Danvers with the superhuman powers she used as Binary to manipulate cosmic energies. The Brood enslave the Acanti, creatures resembling whales that can travel through space, to use them as living starships. Nonetheless, Brood culture seems to have no higher goals than satisfying their needs to feed and to reproduce. Besides the X-Men, the Brood have also clashed with the Fantastic Four and Ghost Rider.
References in classic literature ?
Instead of serried rows of bees sealing up every gap in the combs and keeping the brood warm, he sees the skillful complex structures of the combs, but no longer in their former state of purity.
If," he continued, laying his finger on his cheek, like one who considered deeply all sides of the embarrassing situation in which he found himself,--"if an invention could be framed, which would set these Siouxes and the brood of the squatter by the ears, then might we come in, like the buzzards after a fight atween the beasts, and pick up the gleanings of the ground--there are Pawnees nigh us, too!
These buffaloes have crossed their path, and in chasing the animals, bad luck has led them in open sight of the hill on which the brood of Ishmael have harboured.
And she rose up and drove them before her, till the bride saw them from her window, and was so pleased that she came forth and asked her if she would sell the brood.
Some cicadas are "unsynced" from the brood and may be heard or seen off cycle.
Once these have reached adulthood, the abducted ants must feed the brood of the slavemaking species, search for food, feed the slavemakers, and even defend their nest.
As part of the program, each nest site was georeferenced using Global Positioning System information (GPS; Garmin GPSMAP 62S, Olathe, KS) and the general dimensions of the brood crevice and its position on the rock were recorded and photographed to assist in long-term tracking.
These species reproduce on small vertebrate carcasses, which serve as the sole source of food for both parents and offspring for the duration of the reproductive bout, during which parents provide facultative biparental care [19] and cull the brood through filial cannibalism [20-22] to produce a positive correlation between carcass size and offspring number [20, 21, 23, 24].
Measuring less than 34 inches long and weighing just 5.9 pounds with all accessories installed, the Brood is compact, lightweight and well balanced.
Hence, the aim of the current study was to assess the natural nest volumes, bee spaces and the brood cells dimensions of A.
None of the colonies tested positive for SINV-1, -2, or -3, so the brood loss observed in this study (Fig.