The Calculator

The Calculator

(pop culture)
The Calculator, DC Comics' master of data accumulation, debuted in Detective Comics #463 (1976) in a six-page adventure starring the Atom, “Crimes by Calculation,” by writer Bob Rozakis and artist Mike Grell. The villain's vivid uniform (designed by Grell) of purple-and-white tights with an LCD forehead visor and a chest keyboard was more than a bold fashion statement: it housed a computer that allowed its wearer to calculate crucial info, predict attacks, and deduce weaknesses, keeping the Calculator one step ahead of his opponents. In the Atom's burg of Ivy Town, the Calculator plans to pilfer a machine that stops earthquakes. By typing commands into his chestplate keyboard, he emits solid-energy objects through his visor, confounding the Tiny Titan until the Atom finally overcomes this new foe. At story's end, the crafty Calculator is already plotting to challenge another superhero. The Calculator “started with the idea of a villain who would battle the various back-up [feature] heroes in Detective,” recalled Rozakis in a 2005 interview in BACK ISSUE magazine. For the next four issues the Calculator returned in short stories starring Black Canary, the Elongated Man, and Green Arrow, culminating in issue #468's (1977) full-length tale—written by Rozakis and illustrated by Marshall Rogers and Terry Austin—uniting those “back-up heroes” and the star of Detective, Batman. These popular appearances earned the Calculator the number-two position (behind the Joker) in a 1978 DC Comics supervillains poll. That momentum was ill spent, however, as the Calculator was seen sporadically over the next 25 years, his outings often relegated to skirmishes with minor-league heroes like Air Wave, Blue Beetle, and Hero Hotline. Creator Rozakis had planned to eventually reveal the identity of the man behind the LCD mask, but circumstances prohibited his doing so. Outside of the occasional walk-on or fan roast, the Calculator slipped into obscurity until he was refurbished in the DC Comics miniseries Identity Crisis (2004–2005), scripted by bestselling novelist Brad Meltzer. Retiring his flamboyant costume for an ordinary shirt and tie, the Calculator became the evil equivalent of superhero information-broker Oracle, selling secrets to criminals and supervillains for a fee. Having unmasked the Calculator, Meltzer christened him Noah Kuttler, in actuality the name of one of the author's friends. In the six-issue miniseries Villains United (2005), the Calculator joined mega-menaces Lex Luthor, Deathstroke, Talia, Black Adam, and Dr. Psycho in a sinister society dedicated to waging war against DC's crusaders … and other supervillains.
References in classic literature ?
During this time Nicholl, the calculator, looked over the minutes of their passage, and worked out figures with unparalleled dexterity.
It is known, to the force of a single pound weight, what the engine will do; but, not all the calculators of the National Debt can tell me the capacity for good or evil, for love or hatred, for patriotism or discontent, for the decomposition of virtue into vice, or the reverse, at any single moment in the soul of one of these its quiet servants, with the composed faces and the regulated actions.
Entering the algebraic expression "sin x," then pressing a few keys to take its derivative, displays the answer "cos x" on the calculator's four-line liquid crystal display.
The calculator also helps the consumer to choose easy financing options that suit them.
The calculator reveals that subtracting seven from five is perfectly OK if you are prepared to entertain the idea of negative numbers and that eleven does go into three if you are prepared to entertain the idea of fractions.
The calculator is simple to use and computes the savings based on the user's competitor cost data and selection of the identical services desired from Techna Center, LLC.
RV sales teams can use the calculator to show prospective buyers how much return on investment they could receive (and use to defer costs of ownership).
"Most importantly, we've learned that the calculator is not just a device for doing calculations, but is a device to help students to learn mathematics," said Barry Kissane.
Through the calculator, we wanted to be able to make sense of that data and offer it to clinicians in a useable way.
The calculator provides a comprehensive look at the nutritional values of each ingredient in McDonald's meals.