Georgics

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Georgics

Roman Vergil’s poetic statement set in context of agriculture. [Rom. Lit.: Benét, 389]
See: Farming
References in periodicals archive ?
But there is more to these two stories than we realize at first since Aristaeus is also a shepherd-poet in the Georgics and a possible figure of Virgil.
But Lucretius' eye for illustrative detail is distinctive and original, and his ability to see the poetic in the mundane helped make it possible for Virgil to write the Georgics.
The ubiquitous presence of both agricultural technology and the work of husbandry in Berry's fiction connects his novels and short stories to Virgil's agricultural poem, The Georgics.
The Georgics contain numerous puns on the word cultus, meaning "tilled," "cultivated," and "civilized.
In Chapter 4, Smith examines how the Georgics are a type of wisdom literature.
Allusion to the Georgics is a rare event in Pushkin's work, and critics are generally agreed that Virgil never served Pushkin as a model in the substantial ways that Ovid and Horace sometimes did.
And with primus creating an intertextual link to the Georgics, the work at hand is hence presented as the accomplishment announced in that earlier poem (regardless as to whether Vergil, in the meantime, has modified his plans regarding the epic's overall design).
The whole is patently Virgilian, although Putnam makes a convincing case that the Georgics is Sannazaro's principal inspiration, which helps us appreciate the poem's didactic intentions.
Vergil mentions the river Euphrates only three times and all three instances are placed at very specific geometric points in his poems: in the Georgics at 1.
Albeit he places more emphasis in his text on Vergil's Georgics, Crevecoeur uses both the Georgics and the Aeneid to shape his Early American georgic text.
She excludes from consideration the Eclogues and the Georgics and limits her scope to the reception of the Aeneid in the second half of the century; on the other hand, instead of focusing solely on epic poetry and theory, she goes beyond the field of narrative fiction and examines the role of the Aeneid in less obvious contexts, such as princely education and architectural debates.
RB's poem is as much about EBB's previous Pan poems as it is about Virgil's poetic version of Pan, the white fleece, and Luna in lines 391-393 from the third book of the Georgics.