giant

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giant,

in mythology, manlike being of great size and strength. The giant has been the symbol for the expression of certain recurring beliefs in the mythologies of all races. He is universally represented as being a brutish power of nature, lacking the stature of gods and the civilization and cunning of men. Among the myths of such different cultures as the Greeks, the Scandinavians, and the Native Americans of the Great Plains, giants were believed to be the first race of people that inhabited the earth. Two of the most familiar legends concerning giants are those of Jack the Giant Killer and David and Goliath.

giant

A large highly luminous star that lies above the main sequence on the Hertzsprung–Russell diagram. Giants are grouped in luminosity classes II and III (see spectral types) and generally have absolute magnitudes brighter than 0. Despite their great size, they are not necessarily more massive than typical main-sequence stars; they have dense central cores, but their atmospheres are very tenuous – a feature that shows in their spectra.

Giants represent a late phase in stellar evolution, when the central hydrogen supplies have been exhausted and the star is ‘burning’ other nuclei in concentric shells near its core. As these nuclear processes change, the star's size, luminosity, and temperature gradually alter, and it moves about in the giant region and horizontal branch region of the H–R diagram. Most stars cross the instability strip (see pulsating variables) at least once, and are then Cepheid or RR Lyrae variables. In its final stages, a giant becomes rather brighter and moves to the asymptotic giant branch just above the giants on the H–R diagram. Capella and Arcturus are typical examples of giant stars. See also globular cluster (illustration); red giant; supergiant.

What does it mean when you dream about a giant?

Giants can be good and friendly symbols (e.g., “the jolly Green Giant”) or a fierce and terrifying one (e.g., the “fee fie foe fum” ogre in the story “Jack and the Bean Stalk”). They also symbolize what is outstandingly large and overwhelming in the dreamer’s life, such as a “gigantic” obstacle.

giant

[′jī·ənt]
(mining engineering)

giant

1. Greek myth any of the large and powerful offspring of Uranus (sky) and Gaea (earth) who rebelled against the Olympian gods but were defeated in battle
2. Pathol a person suffering from gigantism
References in classic literature ?
The giant looked contemptuously at the tailor, and said: 'You ragamuffin
answered the little tailor, and unbuttoned his coat, and showed the giant the girdle, 'there may you read what kind of a man I am
At nightfall we returned to the castle, and very soon in came the giant, and one more of our number was sacrificed.
The Giant loved him the best because he had kissed him.
But the children said that they did not know where he lived, and had never seen him before; and the Giant felt very sad.
And when the small distant squeak of their voices reached his ear, the Giant would make answer, "Pretty well, brother Pygmy, I thank you," in a thunderous roar that would have shaken down the walls of their strongest temple, only that it came from so far aloft.
But, being the son of Mother Earth, as they likewise were, the Giant gave them his brotherly kindness, and loved them with as big a love as it was possible to feel for creatures so very small.
In the next instant he realized, from the way the straw crunched between his fingers, that he had captured the non-eatable man, but during that instant of delay Dorothy and Ojo had slipped by the Giant and were out of reach.
The Giant roared so terribly that for a time they were afraid he had broken loose; but he hadn't.
Therefore, the Tin Woodman having by this time fitted new ears to the Sawhorse, the entire party proceeded upon its way, leaving the giant to pound the path behind them.
replied the giant, making an effort that contorted every muscle of his body - "oh
For an instant he appeared, in this frame of granite, like the angel of chaos, but in pushing back the lateral rocks, he lost his point of support, for the monolith which weighed upon his shoulders, and the boulder, pressing upon him with all its weight, brought the giant down upon his knees.