Mad Hatter

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Mad Hatter

(pop culture)
The half-cocked haberdasher known as the Mad Hatter owes a tip of the hat for his notoriety to Batman's television appearances. In Batman #49 (1948) writer Bill Finger introduced Jervis Tetch—drawn by artists Bob Kane, Lew Schwartz, and Charles Paris to resemble the Mad Hatter as illustrated by Sir John Tenniel in author Lewis Carroll's children's classic Alice in Wonderland—as dwarfish thief who hides dangerous armaments like a gas-gun inside his towering top hat. The Mad Hatter proves little more than a headache for Batman and Robin, however, who quickly capture him. The Hatter was back, this time as a wild-eyed, wild-haired crackpot obsessed with collecting valuable headgear, in Detective Comics #230 (1956), where he nearly obtained Batman's cowl by spraying it with a radioactive chemical, forcing the hero to doff his mask. He returned in Batman #161 (1964), attacking the jurors who sent him to prison with an array of trick hats outfitted with weapons. This interpretation of the Mad Hatter and his comic-book appearances were adapted to live-action television as a pair of two-part episodes in ABC's Batman (1966–1968), with actor David Wayne in the role of Jervis Tetch. Wayne's Mad Hatter sported both an odd dialect and a top hat with a hinged lid that opened to reveal a hypnotic device. The second Mad Hatter was written off as an imposter once an updated version of the Aliceinspired villain reemerged in Detective #510 (1981). Throughout scarce 1980s sightings in Batman comics, the Mad Hatter employed mind-controlling devices, from chemicals to implanted microchips, for various crimes including extortion and kidnapping, and once nearly beheaded Batman with buzzsaw straw hats. Television offered the Hatter another shot at wider stardom in Batman: The Animated Series (1992–1995). Tetch—voiced by Roddy McDowell and redesigned by artist Kevin Nowlan as a lanky figure with a gargoyle-grin—was an introverted, lovesick scientist who kidnapped his secretary Alice, mentally manipulating her into a perpetual tea party as his fantasy bride. After four additional episodes, the animated Mad Hatter was reconfigured as a shorter, more macabre character for two episodes of The Adventures of Batman & Robin (1997–1999) and an installment of the WB's Superman cartoon (1996–2000); action figures of both animated incarnations were produced in the 1990s (a comics-inspired Mad Hatter figure was manufactured for the collectors' market in the 2000s). These various interpretations of the Mad Hatter have blended into the peevishly irrational version populating contemporary DC Comics titles. An expert hypnotist, the Mad Hatter committed one of his most monstrous crimes early in his career. As shown in the miniseries Robin: Year One (2000–2001), which retroactively chronicled the history of Dick (the original Robin, later Nightwing) Grayson, Tetch used doctored Walkmans to entrance Grayson's teenage classmates into becoming “Alices,” hosting a disturbing tea party. Fortunately the Boy Wonder stopped the Hatter before he could complete phase two of his plan: selling the girls into slavery in Asia. While he remains committed to dastardly haberdashery, the Mad Hatter, thanks to Batman's intervention, always finds Arkham Asylum for the Criminally Insane the perfect place to hang his hat.
The Supervillain Book: The Evil Side of Comics and Hollywood © 2006 Visible Ink Press®. All rights reserved.

Mad Hatter

crazy gentleman who co-hosts mad tea party. [Br. Lit.: Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland]
See: Madness
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in classic literature ?
Briggs's brother, a radical hatter and grocer, called his sister a purse-proud aristocrat, because she would not advance a part of her capital to stock his shop; and she would have done so most likely, but that their sister, a dissenting shoemaker's lady, at variance with the hatter and grocer, who went to another chapel, showed how their brother was on the verge of bankruptcy, and took possession of Briggs for a while.
And to say the truth, there is, in all points, great difference between the reasonable passion which women at this age conceive towards men, and the idle and childish liking of a girl to a boy, which is often fixed on the outside only, and on things of little value and no duration; as on cherry-cheeks, small, lily-white hands, sloe-black eyes, flowing locks, downy chins, dapper shapes; nay, sometimes on charms more worthless than these, and less the party's own; such are the outward ornaments of the person, for which men are beholden to the taylor, the laceman, the periwig-maker, the hatter, and the milliner, and not to nature.
After this memorable event, I went to the hatter's, and the bootmaker's, and the hosier's, and felt rather like Mother Hubbard's dog whose outfit required the services of so many trades.
But this didn't quite suit his fastidious taste in another minute, being too shiny; so, as they walk up the town, they dive into Nixon's the hatter's, and Tom is arrayed, to his utter astonishment, and without paying for it, in a regulation cat-skin at seven-and- sixpence, Nixon undertaking to send the best hat up to the matron's room, School-house, in half an hour.
Ask the perfumers, ask the blacking-makers, ask the hatters, ask the old lottery-office-keepers--ask any man among 'em what my poetry has done for him, and mark my words, he blesses the name of Slum.
The room is set in Wonderland, where the Hatter has been accused of stealing the Queen of Hearts tarts, and with Alice nowhere to be seen it's your responsibility to save him.
The Hatter first appeared in the novel Alice's Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll, published in 1865.
David Braithwaite, site manager at Saltholme, said: "We hope Alice and the Hatter will help people realise what a wildlife wonderland Saltholme is, as well as encouraging people to spend more time outside enjoying the reserve.
Significant intersections from drilling the Hatter Graben Veins include 12.6ft of 54.00 g/t Au, 27 g/t Ag; 8.1ft of 54.21 g/t Au, 166 g/t Ag; and 6.8ft of 39.91g/t Au, 232 g/t Ag.
The hatter visited Selly Oak Trust School in Oak Tree Lane, Selly Oak, to invite 65 youngsters to a special charity bash at Birmingham Botanical Gardens on July 14.
Breathing in its fumes was certainly not to be recommended, but for the hatter it was one of the many hazards of the trade.
Young shoppers are invited to meet Alice and the Hatter as they join the Metrognomes for their new show.