Avalon

(redirected from The Isle of Avalon)
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Avalon

(ăv`əlŏn), in Celtic mythology, the blissful otherworld of the dead. In medieval romance it was the island to which the mortally wounded King Arthur was taken, and from which it was expected he would someday return. Avalon is often identified with GlastonburyGlastonbury
, town (1991 pop. 6,751), Somerset, SW England. It has a leather industry, but Glastonbury is famous for its religious associations and many legends. One legend tells that St. Joseph of Arimathea founded the first Christian church in England there.
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 in Somerset, England.

Avalon

the blissful otherworld of the dead. [Celtic Myth.: NCE, 194]
See: Heaven

Avalon

island where dead King Arthur was carried. [Arth. Legend and Br. Lit.: Le Morte d’Arthur; Idylls of the King; The Once and Future King]

Avalon

The code name for the Windows Presentation Foundation API. See WPF.
References in periodicals archive ?
Mr Clark said although some legends put Joseph's final resting place after his death in 82AD on the Isle of Avalon - and later accounts say he is buried in Glastonbury Abbey - he may have actually been buried at an ancient church near the River Taff.
Glastonbury Abbey has been taken to be the Isle of Avalon, where Arthur was said to have gone to be healed of his wounds following the Battle of Camlann in 537.
Behind Glastonbury tourist information office you can view a rotting canoe, a relic from about 50AD when this whole low-lying area surrounding the tor really was the Isle of Avalon, full of misty lake settlements cut off from the rest of the country by shallow waters and marshes.
He carried the staff, and when his party climbed a grassy hill on the Isle of Avalon, Joseph is said to have stopped, stuck the staff in the ground and sat down to rest saying, `We are weary all'.
At the time of Christ, the mean sea level was 9ft higher than it is today (DT Pugh: Tides, Surges and Mean Sea Level) and the church of the earliest religious community in Britain, in the 2nd century AD, where Glastonbury Abbey is now, stood on an island at high tide, known as the Isle of Avalon.