Pennines

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Pennines

(pĕn`īnz) or

Pennine Chain,

mountain range, sometimes called the "backbone of England," extending c.160 mi (260 km) from the Cheviot Hills on the Scottish border to the Peak District in Derbyshire. The range consists of a series of upland blocks, separated by transverse valleys (Tees, Aire, Wensleydale, and Wharfdale). There are caverns, and several chasms are more than 300 ft (91 m) in depth. Cross Fell (2,930 ft/893 m) is the highest peak. The range is sparsely populated. Sheep raising, quarrying, and tourism are important economic activities. The Pennine Way is a 268-mi (429-km) hiking path along the range; it opened in 1965. Reservoirs in the Pennines store water for the cities of N England.
References in periodicals archive ?
Additional, faster capacity across the Pennines will be critical to the economic future of the North.
John Jarvis, the Northern Way's transport director, said: "If National Grid relocates the electricity transmission lines as they are currently planning to do, it is essential that the option is kept open for the electricity lines to be put back again into the older tunnels at some future date to provide for a new rail line across the Pennines.
However it is likely, based on the work that the Northern Way has carried out to date, that a new higher speed rail route across the Pennines will need to be built in the next 15-30 years.
Without the availability of the Woodhead Tunnels, this would involve large-scale, expensive tunnelling and would dramatically increase the costs to build any new rail line across the Pennines.
Towards the end of the first century AD, the Romans, led by Agricola, the Governor of Britain, built a road across the Pennines to link the Roman camps at Chester and York.
Forts, including Castleshaw to the west of the Pennines and Slack, at Outlane, to the east, were constructed at intervals between the two legionary bases.
In medieval times packhorse routes were built to transport goods over the Pennines.
LEGGING IT: The traditio o onal way of manouevring a boat through the Standedge Tunnel, but soon steam trains were speeding through the Pennines * ENGINEERING WONDER: Barges enter the Standedge Tunnel at Tunnel End, Marsden ( * ENGINEERING WONDER: Barges enter the Standedge Tunnel at Tunnel End, Marsden (S)
THE Pennine Poets are celebrating their 40th anniversary.
The long-distance Pennine Bridleway route, which passes through Uppermill and Diggle, just over the Pennines from Marsden, will cover a distance of more than 200 miles.
It will link the public rights of way network in south west Kirklees into the Pennine Bridleway National Trail, encouraging tourism and providing a greater range of recreational opportunities for local residents.