Pillars of Hercules

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Pillars of Hercules,

ancient mythological name for promontories flanking the east entrance to the Strait of Gibraltar. They are usually identified with Gibraltar in Europe and with Mt. Acha at Ceuta in Africa. The Jebel Musa (W of Ceuta) is also considered one of the pillars. They are also referred to as the Gates of Hercules.

Pillars of Hercules

promontories at the sides of Straits of Gibraltar; once the limit of man’s travel. [Gk. Myth.: Zimmerman, 110]
References in periodicals archive ?
While it is said that the Pillars of Hercules were constructed to stop traffic beyond the Mediterranean and thus stand on both sides of the coast as Gibraltar and the Atlas mountains, these pillars seem to have yet another meaning in Cervantes' novel.
Originally it was a passage from Plato, who mentions in his dialogues an Egyptian priest who--to give just the bare bones--is supposed to have talked to Solon about an ancient civilization on the island of Atlantis beyond the Pillars of Hercules, a civilization that, in very far-off times, was said to have come close to conquering the whole of Europe, only to disappear eventually under the sea.
The Pillars of Hercules: A Grand Tour of the Mediterranean.
He was like almost every other writer I had known in my life." This is Theroux on Paul Bowles, in The Pillars of Hercules. It is also, of course, himself.
Contemporary thought has but the Pillars of Hercules back in Greece, in the Cyclades Islands, and Atlantis has shriveled from near continental size down to the smallish island of Thera-Santorin, somewhat north and east of Crete.
Other accounts include a return by the same route as they came, sailing east up the Phasis to the world-encircling river Ocean, then southwest to Africa and overland to the Mediterranean (Pindar's version) and sailing up the Phasis, through Russia, and over northern sea routes past Britain and through the Pillars of Hercules. Apollonius includes in the journey the perils of the Sirens, Scylla and Charybdis, and the Wandering Rocks; Medea and Jason, like Odysseus, are given refuse in hospitable Phaeacia on the west coast of Greece, but only after the young lovers marry to void Aeetes' claim to his daughter.
ANSWERS: 1 Stephen King; 2 Suomi; 3 Greg Lemond; 4 Laputa; 5 Sir Robert Peel; 6 Drink it - it's a type of tea; 7 Incense; 8 The Pillars of Hercules; 9 Mamma Mia!; 10 A pieman.
THE sights and sounds of not just two countries, but two different continents, divided by the Pillars of Hercules. This holiday has a real mixture of flavours and experiences.
In the meantime, all of his attention is dedicated to his farm, called The Pillars of Hercules.
For the record the limestone mountain 1,400 ft high was well known in ancient times as the Pillars of Hercules, guarding the entrance to the Mediterranean and its present name is an Anglicised version of its Moorish name, more than 1,000 years old, Gebel el Tarik (Mountain of Tarik).
I found a pub called The Pillars of Hercules, which is still there on Greek Street.
For example, in his chapter "Art or Idol?" he notes that, until Kepler, "it was believed that the eye was a passive receiver and that the image was the active agent of sight." This theory of vision, he suggests, "begins to explain the powerful hold that religious representations, and sculpture in particular, had over the devout." Such a model of cause and effect is surely too positivistic, akin to suggesting that because Homer thought the world was flat, those unfortunate Greeks who dared venture beyond the pillars of Hercules actually did fall over the edge!