posse

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posse

1. US short for posse comitatus, the able-bodied men of a district assembled together and forming a group upon whom the sheriff may call for assistance in maintaining law and order
2. Law possibility (esp in the phrase in posse)
References in periodicals archive ?
Part II explicates the law and history of the posse comitatus from Anglo-Saxon times to the present.
But unless the bond between the Posse and politicians is dissolved, the ugliness may spread even there.
This year, the Posse Foundation received about 7,000 nominations from guidance counselors, community organizations, college advisers, teachers and principals for 350 slots, Bial said.
I've been there, done that," says Eugene stockbroker John Brown, who spent seven months of 1970 in Vietnam, as he tapes a Priority Mail box in the Emerald Street driveway of Eugene attorney Bob Lowry, head of the Posse.
The Land Management System utilizes the following modules with the POSSE application suite and 3rd Party Software:
Later that month, then-Assistant Attorney General Jay Bybee wrote a memo confirming the Administration's view that the Posse Comitatus Act "does not forbid the use of military force for the military purpose of preventing and deterring terrorism within the United States.
The framers even debated the federal government's power to call out the posse comitatus (literally meaning the power or authority of the county) and did not prohibit this established feature of the common law.
The fact that the military services did not assume unilateral control of security, rescue and recovery operations showed the continued relevance of the Posse Comitatus Act, even after 123 years.
Edy's is serving as Planet's distributor in the New York Metropolitan area, with other leading distributors, such as Jack & Jill in the Philadelphia area and Dairi-Farms in Connecticut, supporting the Posse Pops launch.
The Posse is designed as an aid to law enforcement.
Then in 1878, Congress passed the Posse Comitatus Act, declaring army searches, seizures, and arrests on American soil a penitentiary offense.
Virtually all of them had roots in the Posse Comitatus, a radical anti-federal-government movement founded in Oregon in 1969 and popular in the rural Midwest during the eighties farm crisis.