Satyricon

(redirected from The Satyricon)

Satyricon

tales of vice and luxury in imperial Rome. [Rom. Lit.: Satyricon]

Satyricon

novel by Petronius depicting social excesses in imperial Rome. [Rom. Lit.: Magill II, 938]
References in classic literature ?
For, while he was but too ready to accept the position that was almost immediately offered to him on his coming of age, and found, indeed, a subtle pleasure in the thought that he might really become to the London of his own day what to imperial Neronian Rome the author of the Satyricon once had been, yet in his inmost heart he desired to be something more than a mere arbiter elegantiarum, to be consulted on the wearing of a jewel, or the knotting of a necktie, or the conduct of a cane.
The manuscripts of the Satyricon of Petronius Arbiter, described and collected by Charles Beck, Cambridge (Mass.): Riverside Press.
My favourite is from the Satyricon of Petronius (section 50): '[Glass] doesn't stink like bronze, and if it weren't so breakable, I'd prefer it to gold.
Sedonius Falx's disdain for freedmen seems straight out of Petronius' Trimalchio of the Satyricon, and reiterates generic stereotypes of freedmen that are caricatures, rather than nuanced or based on a nobleman's (or freedman's) lived experience, for which other primary sources exist.
the Satyricon", we experience the protagonist's journey with two main loves: his found "little brother" and his ideal love, a "goddess" encased in ice.
The Satyricon of Petronius and the Metamorphoses of Apuleius, Cambridge, 1970, p.
The 11 papers in this collection consider such matters as the presentation of song in Homer's Odyssey, comparative perspectives on the composition of the Homeric simile, the function of the Sanskrit text in a contemporary exposition of the Bhagavatapurana, Proclus on Hesiod's Works and Days, the criticism and practice of literacy in the ancient philosophical tradition, and rehearsed spontaneity in the Satyricon.
The reference to Maecenas, along with allusions to the Satyricon, evoke a history of male "bonds" highlighting connections between modern mentoring such as those represented by Horatio Alger and ancient traditions involving explicit slavery and overt homosexuality, which are deliberately constructed as implicit and covert throughout the novel.
In a different literary vein, the classicist James Tatum deals with the genre of the "auto-obituary" in the figures of Petronius's Trimalchio (The Satyricon) and a beloved cousin in Texas.
Vernacular versions of the Ephesian-widow story date back to Caxton, forward to lost play-texts by Dekker in 1600, and on through the seventeenth century, with the first English translation of the Satyricon appearing in 1694: Hans R.
More recently, Morgan, has stated (2007:111) that 'parallels of form, content, and ethos between the two works are mutually illuminating and interpretatively suggestive', although, due to the fragmentary nature of the Satyricon, he views any attempt to prove a direct connection between the two works as 'futile'.
Arrogant army officer Marcus Vinicius (Pawel Delag) returns to Rome from a successful campaign anxious for a little r&r, which is easily arranged by his uncle Petronius (Boguslaw Linda), witty author of "The Satyricon" and "arbiter of elegance" to the Emperor Nero (Michal Bajor).