sentinel

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sentinel

Computing a character used to indicate the beginning or end of a particular block of information

sentinel

[′sent·ən·əl]
(computer science)
Symbol marking the beginning or end of an element of computer information such as an item or a tape.
References in classic literature ?
Before doing this, the Sentinel turned to the children, and said "Give me your names.
Then the Sentinel scratched violently at the door, and gave a yell that made Bruno shiver from head to foot.
When His Majesty speaks to you," the Sentinel hastily whispered to Bruno, "you should prick up your ears
It is not much; I can do everything for myself if the sentinel will let me pass through the kitchen.
As his fearful instruments touched Grace's head, the voice of the sentinel at the nearest outpost was heard, giving the word in German which permitted Mercy to take the first step on her journey to England:
The voice of the sentinel at the next post was heard more faintly, in its turn: " Pass the English lady
As he spoke, the voice of the sentinel at the final limit of the German lines
The sentinel, more knowing than he of the preceding night, awoke his companions and reported the circumstance.
The moon, which was partially obscured by heavy clouds, now and then lit up the muskets of the sentinels, or silvered the walls, the roofs, and the spires of the town that Charles I.
But Fouquet had recovered his breath, and, beckoning the sentinel and the subaltern, who were rubbing their shoulders, towards him, he said, "There are twenty pistoles for the sentinel, and fifty for the officer.
The soldier made a low and humble acknowledgment for her civility; and Heyward adding a "Bonne nuit, mon camarade," they moved deliberately forward, leaving the sentinel pacing the banks of the silent pond, little suspecting an enemy of so much effrontery, and humming to himself those words which were recalled to his mind by the sight of women, and, perhaps, by recollections of his own distant and beautiful France: "Vive le vin, vive l'amour," etc.
You see, we are, too obviously within the sentinels of the enemy; what course do you propose to follow?