The Shark

The Shark

(pop culture)
Writer John Broome and artist Gil Kane offered a cautionary tale of the dangers of the atomic age in Green Lantern vol. 2 #24 (1963). “The Shark That Hunted Human Prey” was originally a normal tiger shark swimming past an underwater nuclear facility. Radiation evolutionarily accelerates the creature, which mutates into a humanoid with a shark-like head (and a full set of razor-sharp teeth) and psionic and telepathic powers, including matter manipulation and the ability to grow to gigantic size. Despite its intellectual augmentation, this menace—now called the Shark—is driven by its rapacious urges, engorging itself not on flesh but on human psyches. He attempts to induce fear into the mind of Green Lantern II (Hal Jordan), but the hero's indomitable willpower spurs him to victory, and the Shark is devolved to his original state. The Shark evolved again soon thereafter, but by the mid-1960s had returned to dormancy. Director Steven Spielberg's blockbuster Jaws (1975) spawned his return—in combat with Superman—in Action Comics #456 (1976), the cover of which, by artist Mike Grell, borrowed heavily from the movie's famous poster. From the 1970s through the 1990s, the Shark occasionally waded into various DC titles, fighting Aquaman, the Justice League, Black Condor, and his arch-nemesis Green Lantern. At one time he deposed Aquaman from his Atlantean throne, but was bested by the Sea King. Once Hal Jordan returned from the dead in 2005, the Shark—in a grotesque shark-like form—resurfaced to plague the hero in Green Lantern vol. 4 #5, inspiring the villain's 2006 to DC Direct's Green Lantern action-figure line. A different lawbreaker called the Shark predated the mutated Green Lantern foe. This Shark, an evil inventor wearing an oversized shark headpiece, was one of the Terrible Trio (along with the Fox and the Vulture), a minor-league crime team that debuted in the Batman story in Detective Comics #253 (1958).
References in classic literature ?
Well," said the shark, "we know these pirates to be a bad lot--especially Ben Ali.
So the shark went off and chased Ben Ali over to the Doctor.
It was an even toss whether the shark or we would get him, and it was a matter of moments.
The shark dropped back into the sea, helpless, yet with its full strength, doomed--to lingering starvation--a living death less meet for it than for the man who devised the punishment.
The shark was a big brute, and with one drive he cut the boy squarely in half.
Arahu challenged him to tear a fish from a shark's jaws, leaving half to the shark and bringing the other half himself to the surface; and Tudor performed the feat, a flip from the sandpaper hide of the astonished shark scraping several inches of skin from his shoulder.
I obeyed, swimming slowly on, while Otoo swam about me, keeping always between me and the shark, foiling his rushes and encouraging me.
The shark, finding that it was receiving no hurt, had become bolder.
Knowing fully the peril of my act, I thrust the blunt-sharp end of my squid-stick into the side of the shark, much as one would attract a passing acquaintance with a thumb-nudge in the ribs.
But the sharks did not fail to help them at their funeral work.
He had his choice, based on bitter experience, between three days' debauch among the sharks and harpies of the Barbary Coast and a whole winter of wholesome enjoyment and sociability, and there wasn't any doubt of the way he was going to choose.
But the sharks and sharks of various orders and degrees, he concluded, were on the surface.