Song of Roland

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Song of Roland

chanson de geste of Roland and Charlemagne. [Fr. Lit.: Song of Roland]
See: Epic
References in periodicals archive ?
Oliver is in fact a Viking name originally being Olaf, but it became popular in France because of the epic The Song of Roland in which a character called Olivier was Roland's advisor.
Oliver is in fact a Viking name, originally being V Olaf, f but it became popular in France because of the epic The Song of Roland in which a character called Olivier was Roland's advisor.
Their greatest moments come in the Song of Roland, which depicts their defence of Charlemagne's army against the Saracens of Al-Andalus, and their deaths at the Battle of Roncevaux Pass.
She shows how, beginning with his translation of the major French works Tristan and Isolde and The Song of Roland, Bedier, who was from the island of Reunion, instigated an image of France's greatness that became widely accepted and employed in such venues as the Paris Exposition of 1900, which is discussed at length.
Kelly's discussion of The Song of Roland (117-78) is equally strong.
From the oral traditions of the Song of Roland, stating that God will not allow a death of solider of Charlemagne be unavenged, to more popular works such as the Hunchback of Notre Dame, "One Hundred Great French Books" is a treasure trove of information about the best of French literature, a fine addition to literary studies collections.
The essays in this volume, written by over thirty contributors, mostly reflect the experience of teachers in the American higher education system, in which the Song of Roland is taught in a wide variety of courses at different levels, either in the original or through the medium of translation, and either in its entirety or from selected extracts.
The Song of Roland on Absolutes and Relative Values.
The second part of MS Digby 23 constitutes the oldest surviving copy of the Song of Roland, the famous Old French epic celebrating the courage of Charlemagne's rear guard and the supremacy of the Christian Roman Empire over the Saracens.
One failed campaign in Spain inspired the first great epic poem in French literature, The Song of Roland.
For example, Wolfgang van Emden's piece on the Song of Roland, a work on which a vast amount has been written in the last hundred and fifty years, is a masterly encapsulation of description, background and points of academic controversy, while conveying the contributor's enthusiasm for his subject with a lightness of touch.
Both are indexed, suggested, pointed to, by the Song of Roland, rather than produced in it.