Sorbonne

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Sorbonne

(sôrbôn`), first endowed college in the Univ. of ParisParis, University of,
at Paris, France; founded 12th cent., confirmed 1215 by papal bull. The most famous of its colleges was the Sorbonne, which opened in 1253 and gained academic and theological distinction during the late Middle Ages and early modern times; the name Sorbonne
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, founded by Robert de Sorbon (1201–74), chaplain of Louis IX, and opened in 1253 for the purpose of providing quarters for theology students who were not friars. Gaining academic and theological distinction in the late Middle Ages and early modern times, the Sorbonne gained preponderance over its early mendicant college rivals, and Sorbonne doctors were frequently called upon to render opinions on important ecclesiastical and theological issues. In the 16th cent., because it became the place for the deliberations of the faculty of theology, this faculty came to be called the Sorbonne, although all its members did not belong to this college. In 1626 it was enlarged.

After its suppression (1792) in the French Revolution, the Univ. of France took over (1808) the Sorbonne grounds, so that for the years between 1808 and 1885 the Sorbonne existed as the seat of the three faculties of theology and of the Académie de Paris. In 1885 a general council of faculties, presided over by the rector of the university, was created. The Sorbonne grounds now house facilities of several of the universities the Univ. of Paris was divided into in 1970 as well as facilities of the rectorate for those universities and of other educational institutions. Sorbonne has frequently been used as a name for the Univ. of Paris.

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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Sorbonne

 

a college founded in Paris between 1253 and 1257 by R. de Sorbon. Since the mid-17th century, after the merger of the Sorbonne with the University of Paris, the names of the two institutions have been used synonymously.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

Sorbonne

University of Paris; long esteemed as educational center. [Fr. Hist.: Brewer Dictionary, 1019]
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

Sorbonne

the. a part of the University of Paris containing the faculties of science and literature: founded in 1253 by Robert de Sorbon as a theological college; given to the university in 1808
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
He is accused of overestimating the role of the University: his statement that the Sorbonne's influence affected all the strata of sixteenth-century society has give rise to many doubts (see F.
It may seem odd to commence the substantive section of this essay with Josette Riandiere La Roche's Nouveau Documents Quevediens (1992), with her text in French, published by the Sorbonne. The work appeared, however, under the auspices of the Centre de Recherche sur l'Espagne des XVIe et XVIIe Siecles (CRES), with a preface by Augustin Redondo, who guided the author through an exemplary biographical investigation of the Quevedo family.