the Sound


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Sound, the:

see ØresundØresund
or the Sound,
Swed. Öresund, c.45 mi (70 km) long, strait between the Danish island of Sjælland and Sweden, connecting the Kattegat with the Baltic Sea, to which it is the deepest channel. Between Helsingborg and Helsingør it is only 2.
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, Denmark and Sweden.
References in classic literature ?
The sound which had frightened them was not repeated, but it had been sufficient as it was to start me speculating on the possible horror which lurked in the shadows at my back.
Minutes merged into quarters of hours, and quarters of hours into half-hours, and still the sound persisted, ever changing from its initial vocal impulse yet never receiving fresh impulse--fading, dimming, dying as enormously as it had sprung into being.
I am not sure that I ever heard the sound of cock-crowing from my clearing, and I thought that it might be worth the while to keep a cockerel for his music merely, as a singing bird.
But when Le Renard raised his voice in a long and intelligible whoop, it was answered by a spontaneous yell from the mouth of every Indian within hearing of the sound.
Then, after a while, came four more, panting with their running, and two of these four were Will Scathelock and Midge, the Miller; for all of these had heard the sound of Robin Hood's horn.
Little by little, the sound came nearer and nearer to my bed--and then suddenly stopped just as I fancied it was close by me.
No window or barrier could shut out the sound, till the ears of any listener became dulled by the ceaseless murmur.
The sounds, which he had not heard for so long, had an even more pleasurable and exhilarating effect on Rostov than the previous sounds of firing.
"Mister Haggin" was the sound that meant "God." In Jerry's heart and head, in the mysterious centre of all his activities that is called consciousness, the sound, "Mister Haggin," occupied the same place that "God" occupies in human consciousness.
The sound I mean may be either a vowel, a semi-vowel, or a mute.
It was like the sound of a church-bell: but it was only heard for a moment, for the rolling of the carriages and the voices of the multitude made too great a noise.
If he invented sounds for it, his fellows did not understand the sounds. Then it was that he fell back on pantomime, illustrating the thought wherever possible and at the same time repeating the new sound over and over again.