UNIVAC I

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UNIVAC I

(UNIVersal Automatic Computer) The first mass produced and commercially successful computer, introduced in 1951 by Remington Rand. Over 40 systems were sold. The UNIVAC I's memory was made of mercury-filled acoustic delay lines that held 1,000 12-digit numbers. It used magnetic tapes that stored 1MB of data at a density of 128 cpi. In 1952, the computer predicted Eisenhower's victory over Stevenson, and, for a while, UNIVAC was synonymous with "computer." UNIVAC I machines were in use until the early 1960s. See delay line memory and early memory.


UNIVAC I
The circuitry that filled up the walk-in CPU of the UNIVAC I now fits on your finger. This photo was the news coverage of Eisenhower's prediction. (Image courtesy of Unisys Corporation.)







Very Impressive Console
John Mauchly, one of the UNIVAC's designers, is leaning on the "high-tech" console that wowed audiences. Notice the typewriter (right) and oscilloscope (left). (Image courtesy of Rare Book & Manuscript Library, University of Pennsylvania.)
References in periodicals archive ?
Grace Brewster Hopper was enchanted with its performance, until the UNIVAC I came along--operating a thousand times faster.
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Hopper created a new job for herself and a new department at Remington Rand--research devoted 'teaching' the Univac new skills.
TAKE A LOOK sometime at the pictures of the UNIVAC computer first introduced in the 1950s.
Although the first commercial American computer, the UNIVAC I, was sold to the U.
Mauchly and Eckert wrote the 12-page document to explain how the UNIVAC had evolved from the earlier ENIAC and EDVAC (illustrated above).
Four insurance organizations sent 47 representatives to learn about the capabilities of the Univac computer system.
I began writing programs for the Univac II at the Philadelphia Navy Yard in 1961 using Assembly language.
Right out of college, Cray was able to land a job with Engineering Research Associates where he worked on the first commercial computer, the UNIVAC.
Back in the days of the UNIVAC, buildings professionals didn't have to worry about anyone making off with their valuable computer hardware.
One of the most dramatic events to shape public opinion about computers was the use of the UNIVAC I to predict the 1952 presidential election.
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