wilderness

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wilderness,

land retaining its primeval character with the imprint of humans minimal or unnoticeable. In the United States, the Wilderness Act of 1964 established the National Wilderness Preservation System with a nucleus of 9 million acres (3.6 million hectares) of land in 54 different areas, mostly in Western states, and provided for the designation of new wilderness areas. By 1992, the total had risen to 95 million acres (38.4 million hectares) in 708 parcels of land. Alaska, with 57.6 million acres (23.3 million hectares), was by far the leading repository of wilderness; Ohio had but 77 acres, and some states had none, although designated areas included several Eastern locations where signs of civilization were substantially erased. Wilderness lands are to be preserved in their natural condition, wild and undeveloped, both for their own sake and for humankind's solitude and enjoyment of their beauty. The idea of wilderness has deep roots in American thought (see environmentalismenvironmentalism,
movement to protect the quality and continuity of life through conservation of natural resources, prevention of pollution, and control of land use. The philosophical foundations for environmentalism in the United States were established by Thomas Jefferson,
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). In the 17th cent. William Penn decreed that one acre of forest be left wild for every five that were cleared. Henry David Thoreau believed that the existence of wilderness was justified by the inspiration people could draw from it.

Bibliography

See P. Brooks, The Pursuit of Wilderness (1971); R. Nash, Wilderness and the American Mind (3d ed. 1982).

Wilderness

[′wil·dər·nəs]
(geology)
A North American stage of Middle Ordovician geologic time, above Porterfield and below Trentonian.

wilderness

a wild, uninhabited, and uncultivated region

Wilderness

the. the barren regions to the south and east of Palestine, esp those in which the Israelites wandered before entering the Promised Land and in which Christ fasted for 40 days and nights
References in periodicals archive ?
What takes years to happen in the human-controlled environment of settlement is speed-shifted in the wilderness. The special grace of wilderness is that it is a catalyst for revival and spiritual formation.
And we have one of the answers to our question "What is God up to?" (There may be many others; this is only one.) God is up to, in some sense, the same thing as God's been up to all along: the choosing of a people, who are gathered in the wilderness and prepared for God to dwell with them.
"The Context of a Biblical Study of the Wilderness" includes a review of the current research and debate surrounding the relationship of the Judeo-Christian tradition and the natural world.
The hinge here is the wilderness experiences; there needs to be access to this wilderness.
According to the Bible, God appeared to Moses in the burning bush in the countryside, and Moses led the Israelites through the wilderness for 40 years during their exodus from Egypt.
Angles In The Wilderness: The True Story Of One Woman's Survival Agains All Odds is the biographical story of how heroine and author Amy Racina became lost in deep wilderness and faced a truly life-threatening situation.
Friends of the Allegheny Wilderness (www.pawild.org) and other groups are promoting a plan that would ask Congress to significantly expand the wilderness area in the national forest.
All those folks finding themselves wondering if Canadian winters could really be that tough should remember that wandering out in the wilderness for a while is not always a bad thing.
Ian Player's Zulu Wilderness could also have been featured in our biography section, for really, it's as much a personal memoir of the author's experiences traveling in the African wilderness and his work as a conservationist as it is a travelogue of the region--but it's featured here for its fine survey of the wilderness of South Africa, the social and conservation issues at hand, and its exciting 'you are there' adventure sensation.
The main character is Cecile, a remarkable young woman who has been with her father in the wilderness as he lives among Indians, trading and trapping.
In so doing, he seeks to differentiate the objectives of those who formed the Wilderness Society in the 1930s from those of the founders of the conservation movement in the Progressive Era, and, somewhat more surprisingly, to some extent as well from those of the environmentalists of the 1960s.