Great Attractor

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Related to The great attractor: Shapley Supercluster

Great Attractor

A large concentration of mass that is detectable only by its powerful gravitational pull on our Galaxy and its Local Supercluster. Redshift surveys in the late 1980s revealed that the peculiar motion of the Local Group relative to the microwave background was not due solely to the gravitational effect of the Virgo cluster, but also to large-scale structure just beyond the Hydra–Centaurus supercluster in the southern sky.

Great Attractor

[¦grāt ə′trak·tər]
(astronomy)
A great supercluster of galaxies and dark matter, approximately 150 × 106 light-years distant, whose existence has been hypothesized to account for the peculiar motions of galaxies, including the Milky Way Galaxy.
References in periodicals archive ?
A Dynamical Analysis of the Most Massive Cluster in the Great Attractor, Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 383, 445-457 Zheng, C.
Optimisation of the NIR Survey Strategy in Unveiling Galaxies in the Great Attractor.
An example of a galaxy in the nearby Universe undergoing galaxy transformation due to cluster infall is WKK6176, a jellyfish spiral galaxy near the centre of the Norma cluster at the Great Attractor (see below).
To further our understanding of the Great Attractor (GA), Woudt and Kraan-Korteweg have been involved in a deep near-infrared survey (with the IRSF in Sutherland) of the Norma Wall of galaxies; a highly obscured large-scale structure central to the Great Attractor, running nearly parallel to the Galactic plane.
The resulting large-scale structures were investigated, in particular the boundaries of the Local Void (presented at an international meeting Sydney), a parallel arm to the Great Attractor Wall, and the possible connection of the Norma cluster to the Ophiuchus supercluster revealed.
Discovery of two galaxies deeply embedded in the Great Attractor wall.
Intriguingly a region of the sky directly opposite the Great Attractor, part of a cluster of galaxies known as Perseus-Pisces, also appears mountainous, revealing that it too has a higher-than-average mass density.
But Dekel suggests that the Great Attractor wins the tug-of-war, since the region between our galaxy and Perseus-Pisces lacks mass.
But that motion also suggests that one or several huge collections of matter, well beyond the location of the Great Attractor and residing somewhere outside the surveyed region, is pulling on the Abell clusters.
Burstein was a member of the international team of astronomers who first identified the large-scale galactic flow toward the Great Attractor (SN: 3/22/86, p.
Even the Great Attractor and the Perseus-Pisces region on opposite sides of the Milky Way are difficult to study, because dust surrounding and permeating our galaxy obscures the view in their directions.
There's also no evidence that objects in the Great Attractor region are themselves moving toward the supercluster.