Nazism

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Related to The nazis: World War 2, The Holocaust

Nazism:

see National SocialismNational Socialism
or Nazism,
doctrines and policies of the National Socialist German Workers' party, which ruled Germany under Adolf Hitler from 1933 to 1945.
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Nazism

see NATIONAL SOCIALISM.
References in periodicals archive ?
We recognize that AP should have done some things differently during this period, for example protesting when AP photos were exploited by the Nazis for propaganda within Germany and refusing to employ German photographers with active political affiliations and loyalties," the report said.
A government report published in October this year found that nearly 77 percent of officials employed in the justice ministry in 1957 were once members of the Nazi Party.
He notes that the Nazis had to balance the "Normative State" with the "Prerogative State" to ensure social order in the long ran.
The Villa 1938 tour of Nazi Germany was just before the England national team played Germany in the 1936 Berlin Olympic stadium and the players, on the advice from the Foreign Office, were pressurised to give the Nazi salute in front of over 100,000 Germans.
Souvenirs and pictures from the Nazi era were tossed into the backs of closets and purposely forgotten.
The poll also showed that 61 per cent of Austrian adults wanted to see a "strong man" in charge of government, and 54 per cent said they thought it would be "highly likely" that the Nazis would win seats in they were allowed to take part in an election.
The Nazis and their helpers also altered their ideas of racial hierarchy by flattering the Arabs and Iranians to include them in their circle of favored races.
You may have never heard of him, but he's been displaying the Nazi symbol, the swastika, on his property, and it is clearly visible from the state highway.
This is the opening sequence of probably the most famous Nazi propaganda film of all time, Triumph of the Will made by Leni Riefenstahl at the Nazi rally at Nuremberg in 1934.
Which of the major findings of this excellent study is more disturbing: that human beings are capable of inventing and believing the kind of vicious nonsense the Nazis believed about Jews, or that such profoundly irrational beliefs can become the basis of a meticulously devised and implemented program of industrial mass murder?
For this, Roth, whose father fled the Nazis, endured the usual calumnies, as Rosa Brooks noted in a column in the Los Angeles Times.