Theagenes


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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Theagenes

 

Tyrant of Megara in Greece during the second half of the seventh century B.C.

Theagenes came to power after leading a revolt of farmers and artisans against the clan aristocracy. He returned the common pasture lands to the demos, abolished interest on debts, and granted political rights. Under his rule, the colonies of Byzantium and Chalcedon were established and a military alliance was concluded with Miletus and Aegina. Theagenes was driven from Megara by the aristocratic landowners and wealthy artisans. After his ouster, an oligarchy was established.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in classic literature ?
This was the case of Pisistratus at Athens, when he opposed the Pediaci: and of Theagenes in Megara, who slaughtered the cattle belonging to the rich, after he had seized those who kept them by the riverside.
They recorded that when the Thasians erected a statue to Theagenes, a victor in the games, one of his rivals went to it by night and endeavored to throw it down by repeated blows, until at last he moved it from its pedestal and was crushed to death beneath its fall.
The textual origin of such feats can be classical, as in the Aethiopica, in which the hero Theagenes (the possible inspiration for Periandro) does manage to bring a bull to its knees, with the help of a horse, and also defeats a giant in a wrestling match.
Historie om Theagenes og Chaciclea af Heliodore af Phoenicien, Copenhagen, 1746.
119-131), the partarb stone is interpreted as 'that which fears all' ([TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]), suggesting the it stands for fear of God, because God is all ([TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]), rather than literally 'fearing all things' as stated by Theagenes (8.11).
(11) A couple, in this case Theagenes and Charicleia, have to brave various ordeals before they are united in marriage.
THEAGENES (Race 3) is flying at present and should complete his hat-trick in the competitive open hurdle contest.
Such (and higher) number of Olympic victories was achieved by other ancient athletes, for example, in a fight mentioned Spartans Hipposthenes and Hetoimokles, Arrhachion of Figalia won three times in pankratios in the ancient Games in Olympia, or Tisandros of Naxos with four victories in boxing in Olympia, which made him the most successful boxer of all time, the athlete of the island Thasos, Theagenes was a twice Olympic champion (he collected together from 1200 to 1400 winnings in the Greek plays from the boxing and pankratios and some games from dolichos) and was known as "a wonderful god" (V Olivova, 1988, p.
Compiled by Frederick Menius, Engelische Comedien und Tragedien, in addition to two Pickelherring plays and six interludes, collects eight plays--Esther and Haman, The Prodigal Son, Fortunatus, A King's Son of England and a King's Daughter of Scotland, Sidonia and Theagenes. Nobody and Somebody, Julio and Hyppolita, and A Very Lamentable Tragedy of Titus Andronicus--all performed by English actors in towns and at courts in Germany.
The leader of the Thessalian embassy was the young man Theagenes, whose imposing stature ([TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]) and handsome appearance ([TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]) were sufficient proof, in the eyes of the priest, of his descent from Achilles ([TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]) and confirmed his divine birth from the goddess Thetis ([TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]--a pun on the young man's name).
Petersson notes that 'The love affair of Kenelm and Venetia attracted so much public interest that James Shirley seems to have used it as the theme of his tragi-comedy The Wedding', and that Kenelm Digby himself told their story in his memoirs, fictionalized as Theagenes and Stelliana: