theism

(redirected from Theistic religion)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.

theism

(thē`ĭzəm), in theology and philosophy, the belief in a personal God. It is opposed to atheism and agnosticism and is to be distinguished from pantheismpantheism
[Gr. pan=all, theos=God], name used to denote any system of belief or speculation that includes the teaching "God is all, and all is God." Pantheism, in other words, identifies the universe with God or God with the universe.
..... Click the link for more information.
 and deism (see deistsdeists
, term commonly applied to those thinkers in the 17th and 18th cent. who held that the course of nature sufficiently demonstrates the existence of God. For them formal religion was superfluous, and they scorned as spurious claims of supernatural revelation.
..... Click the link for more information.
). Unlike pantheists, theists do not hold God to be identical to the universe. Like deists, they believe that God created the universe and transcends it; unlike the deists, they hold that God involves himself in human affairs. For a summary of the arguments that support theism, see GodGod,
divinity of the three great monotheistic religions, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, as well as many other world religions. See also religion and articles on individual religions. Names for God

In the Old Testament various names for God are used.
..... Click the link for more information.
.

Theism

(religion, spiritualism, and occult)

In the broadest sense, theism means a belief in God. The general implication, however, is that the belief is held in a conscious and rational manner; hence theism is usually applied only to a system of beliefs that has some claim to be regarded as a philosophy. Wiccans are considered polytheists, believing in more than one god. They might also be regarded as pantheists, believing that the divine is in all of Nature.

Theism is the direct antithesis of atheism, which is a denial of the existence of a god. Theism is also distinguished from deism, a belief held by a group of eighteenth-century writers on natural religion who thought of god and the world as being quite separate and distinct.

Theism

 

a religious world view proceeding from an understanding of absolute being as an infinite divine person who is transcendent to the world and who created the world in a free act of will and continues to control it. (In orthodox Christianity, god is understood as a “trinity” of three such persons.)

Acceptance of the transcendancy of god distinguishes theism from pantheism. In theism, god is conceived as the source of the being of all things yet is separate from all things. (Catholic theology, however, postulates an “analogy of being” between the being of god and the being of things.) Theism differs in this both from monistic mysticism, with its concept of the identity between god and the world, and the pantheistic concept of emanation, by which the world is described as naturally and necessarily emanating from the fullness of divine being. The acceptance of the continuing, conscious, active role of god in the world distinguishes theism from deism and accounts for the concepts of divine providence and the miracles that are characteristic of theism.

Theism developed in its purest form within the framework of three genetically linked religions: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. The term “theism” was first used by the English philosopher R. Cudworth.

Marxism-Leninism’s critique of theism as a type of religious world view is based on the general principles of the critique of any form of religious consciousness. (SeeRELIGION.)

theism

1. the form of the belief in one God as the transcendent creator and ruler of the universe that does not necessarily entail further belief in divine revelation
2. the belief in the existence of a God or gods
References in periodicals archive ?
In Part III, Plantinga argues that there is in fact 'deep accord' between science and theistic religion.
Yet, it can be difficult to tell modern science (7) and theistic religion (8) apart because the characterizations of science as a secular or humanistic religion, a hostile materialistic or mechanistic faith, and/or just a theory or belief system confuse it with scientism.
Thus, to assert that modern science simply strips us of any impulse beyond the material or mechanical and is thus hostile to human flourishing, dignity, thoughts, feelings, and desires is as uninformed, if not as dishonest, as asserting that theistic religion has brought only pain and suffering to humankind.
For example, taken together quantum mechanics and general relativity shape science's present understanding of the physical laws of the universe, but these worldviews (or theories) are incompatible with one another (14) (in this sense, theistic religion and modern science conjoined are necessarily incompatible (15)).
Must Modern Science and Theistic Religion be Compatible?
So, for example, some reason that the history of science shows that modern science and theistic religion must be compatible--since many scientists in the past were theists and the origin of science itself is due in large part to religion (i.
What's more, we may argue that the goal of establishing some aspect in common with religion is motivated by the (perceived) need to defend theistic religion from any possible criticism or charge coming from modern science.
Hence, modern science and theistic religion need not be compatible because key aspects of science are based upon (or have something in common with) religion.
Moreover, this same type of process not only lies behind many of the ritual practices and beliefs of certain primitive societies, but has been found in many of our present-day ritual practices and beliefs of theistic religion.
First, formal theistic religion is not what informs the social sciences or gives them their particular character.
Christianity--as with many theistic religions, including Judaism and Islam--is rife with scripture and reports of God's continuing activities in the world.
The authors of the first four articles focus primarily on theistic religions in this regard, such as Christianity, Islam, and Judaism.