Coelolepida

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Coelolepida

[‚sē·lō′lep·ə·da]
(paleontology)
An order of extinct jawless vertebrates (Agnatha) distinguished by skin set with minute, close-fitting scales of dentine, similar to placoid scales of sharks.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Studies of Palaeozoic Thelodonti (Craniata: Agnatha).
Thelodus macintoshi Stetson 1928, the largest known thelodont (Agnatha: Thelodonti).
The subclass Thelodonti includes five orders, Loganelliiormes Turner, 1991, Shieliiormes Marss, Wilson & Thorsteinsson, 2002, Phlebolepidiformes Berg, 1937, Thelodontiformes Kiaer, 1932, and Furcacaudiformes Wilson & Caldwell, 1998.
The family Longodidae certainly belongs to the subclass Thelodonti as its squamation is built of separate dermal scales with a crown, neck, and base.
Loganellia (Thelodonti, Agnatha) from the Lower Silurian of North Greenland, with special reference on their stratigraphical and palaeogeographical significance.
With these revised interpretations, it will be possible for new reconstructions and artistic representations of Phlebolepis elegans to be based on more reliable information, so that it can continue to be used as a prime example of both Silurian vertebrates and members of the Thelodonti. In addition, comparisons of the morphology of Phlebolepis with that of other early vertebrates will have a sounder basis, leading to improved understanding of the evolution of the vertebrate body plan, including the mouth and paired and median fins.
Articulated squamations as well as many isolated scales derived from acetic-acid residues of rock samples, allow establishment of 39 species (25 of which are new) of Thelodonti, distributed in 25 genera (10 new) and 16 families (6 new), along with 5 orders (1 new), as well as two new species that are provisionally classified as chondrichthyans.
the same general type is found in two or more subclasses), but on the other hand, the finer details of the ultrasculpture are more specific and allow the subdivision, for example, of the subclass Thelodonti, into four orders.
Our understanding of the Palaeozoic vertebrate subclass Thelodonti has improved greatly in recent years as a result of new discoveries (e.g., Wilson & Caldwell 1993, 1998; Mdrss 1999; Mdrss et al.