Theocritus


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Theocritus

(thēŏk`rĭtəs), fl. c.270 B.C., Hellenistic Greek poet, b. Syracuse. The history of the pastoralpastoral,
literary work in which the shepherd's life is presented in a conventionalized manner. In this convention the purity and simplicity of shepherd life is contrasted with the corruption and artificiality of the court or the city.
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 begins with him, and in him the form seems to have reached its height. His poetic style is finished and at times artificial, but the bucolic characters in his idyls seem alive. Theocritus has been widely imitated (e.g., by such poets as Vergil and Spenser).

Theocritus

 

Born late fourth century B.C.; died first half of the third century B.C. Greek poet.

Theocritus was a native of either Syracuse in Sicily or the island of Cos. He invented the idyll and introduced the shepherd longing for love as a stock figure. Theocritus’ depictions of city dwellers are in the tradition of Sophron’s mimes. The interest the poet took in the daily life of ordinary people constitutes the artistic and thematic importance of his work. Theocritus was consistent in his compositional form, using dialogues or stories told in song. His style is sometimes sophisticated in its treatment of mythology and sometimes deliberately naive. Approximately 30 idylls attributed to Theocritus survive, but not all of them are considered genuine.

PUBLICATIONS

Theocritus: Works, vols. 1–2. Edited with a translation and commentary by A. S. F. Gow. Cambridge, 1950.
In Russian translation:
Feokrit, Moskh, Bion: Idillii i epigrammy. Translation and commentary by M. E. Grabar’-Passek. Moscow, 1958.

REFERENCE

Radtsig, S. I. Istoriia drevnegrecheskoi literatury, 3rd ed. Moscow, 1969.

Theocritus

poet; rhapsodized over charm of rustic life. [Gk. Lit.: Brewer Dictionary, 813]

Theocritus

?310--?250 bc, Greek poet, born in Syracuse. He wrote the first pastoral poems in Greek literature and was closely imitated by Virgil
References in periodicals archive ?
Theocritus (Idyll 8, 57-39), confirms for us that pastoral literature is really a "mirage" (cit.
HUNTER, Theocritus and the Archaeology of Greek Poetry, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 1996, pp.
Otherwise, Ptolemys II's contemporary, the bucolic poet Theocritus (Idyll 17.
Sauvages following the ideas of the Theocritus, Rhodiginus and Sennert approached to the problem and was doubtful about including the Gutta Rosea of wine bibbers in the same category as ordinary acne.
The writings of the Greek bucolic poet Theocritus are considered as a possible source for the conception of the frescoes, with Chigi himself cast in the role of the hapless Polyphemus.
The traditionally pastoral shepherd and the intertextualised sheep he describes are implicitly meant to represent his own careworn sensibility: "His sheep did not flock together/As they do in Spenser and Theocritus.
From Theocritus and Virgil's classical elegies to the reinvigoration of the form by, among others, Ben Jonson and John Milton, the deictic "here" (or the Latin hic) orients readers in a consolatory pastoral landscape: here are sweetly humming bees, here are cool springs, here is where the daisies grow.
Review of A Sens, Theocritus Dioscuroi: Idyll 22 (Gottingen 1997).
Continuing his story of the sampogna, the priest tells of the great masters who have played the grand pastoral flute after Pan--he alludes to Theocritus, whose Idylls are recognized by critics as the genesis of the pastoral mode; and Virgil, whose Eclogues were immensely influential.
He is able to identify the sources of Sannazaro's borrowings--not only words, but the mythological references, as well as many of the Greek names that were taken from Theocritus.
In Greek and Latin poetry, you have read or will read at school, Vergil, Terence, Horace, Anacreon, Theocritus, Homer, Euripides, Sophocles.