Theodor Herzl


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Related to Theodor Herzl: Balfour Declaration, Zionism
Theodor Herzl
Benjamin Ze’ev Herzl
Birthday
BirthplacePest, Kingdom of Hungary
Died
NationalityAustria-Hungary
Occupation
Journalist, playwright, writer, political activist
EducationLaw
Known for Father of modern political Zionism

Herzl, Theodor

(tā`ōdôr hĕr`tsəl), 1860–1904, Hungarian Jew, founder of modern ZionismZionism,
modern political movement for reconstituting a Jewish national state in Palestine. Early Years

The rise of the Zionist movement in the late 19th cent.
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. Sent to Paris as a correspondent for the Vienna Neue Frei Presse, he reported on the Dreyfus affair. Appalled by the vicious anti-Semitism he observed, he decided that Jewish assimilation in Europe was impossible and that the only solution to the Jewish problem was the establishment of a Jewish national state. He stated his ideas in his famous pamphlet, Der Judenstaat, first published in 1896. Herzl organized the first Zionist World Congress (1897) and served as its president from its inception until his death. In 1949 his body was moved from Vienna to Jerusalem, for burial with the highest honors by the Israeli nation.

Bibliography

See his diaries (ed. by R. Patai, tr. 1960); biographies by A. Bein (tr. 1962), D. Stewart (1974), and N. H. Finkelstein (1987); I. Friedman and H. M. Sacher, ed., Herzl's Political Activity, 1897–1904 (1988).

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References in periodicals archive ?
(3.) Kornberg, Theodor Herzl, 182-84; and Beller, Herzl, 35-61.
In Search of Israel is especially illuminating on the pre-state period, and even well-informed readers are likely to find revealing nuggets, as when Vienna's chief rabbi visited Theodor Herzl's home and "caught Herzl lighting the candles on his Christmas tree," Brenner says.
In his Diary, Theodor Herzl writes about the establishment of a Jewish state: "We should form there a portion of rampart of Europe against Asia, an outpost of civilization as opposed to barbarism." Here, it clearly shows his colonial, racist mentality.
Theodor Herzl, the person, is regarded as the father of Israel.
The author explores 18 classics of Jewish literature to illustrate Jewish thought and experience over a period of 2,500 years: the books of Deuteronomy and Esther, The Exposition of Laws by Philo of Alexandria, The Jewish War by Flavius Josephus, Pirkei Avot, the Itinerary of Benjamin of Tudela, the Kuzari by Yehuda Halevi, The Guide of the Perplexed by Moses Maimonides, the Zohar, the Tsenerene and the Memoirs of GlEckel of Hameln, Theological-Political Treatise by Baruch Spinoza, the Autobiography of Solomon Maimon, Jerusalem by Moses Mendelssohn, the Tales of Nachman of Bratslav, The Jewish State and Old New Land by Theodor Herzl, and Tevye the Dairyman by Sholem Aleichem.
In fact, the Holy See expressed reservations only in response to the theological arguments presented by Theodor Herzl, who had used them effectively with the evangelical Lord Balfour of England and unwisely offered the same arguments to the pope.
This sole focus on ideas explains why the author draws parallels between Jinnah and Theodor Herzl, the secular visionaries of states.
In the afternoon, the President, who was also accompanied by First Lady Andri Anastasiades, Foreign Minister Ioannis Kasoulides, Government Spokesman Nicos Christodoulides and other senior officials, laid a wreath at the burial site of Theodor Herzl, on Mount Herzl.
William Henry Hechler, a close friend of the founder of modern Zionism, Theodor Herzl, was the only non-Jewish person at the first Zionist Congress in Switzerland in 1897--and probably the first person called a "Christian Zionist," said Ateek.
Netanyahu sees himself in world historical terms and admires Theodor Herzl and Winston Churchill -- two men who saw dangers ahead of other people.
His outlook, therefore, combined that of David Ben-Gurion and Chaim Weizmann, Zionist leaders who were born in the shtetl, with that of the assimilated Theodor Herzl, the father of Zionism.
From Israel Prize recipient Shlomo Avineri comes Herzl's Vision, a timely, revealing, and immensely readable new biography of Theodor Herzl, who is credited with conceptualizing modern Zionism.