Reik, Theodor

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Reik, Theodor

(tā`ōdōr rīk), 1888–1969, American psychologist and author, b. Vienna, Ph.D. Univ. of Vienna, 1912. He was one of Sigmund Freud's earliest and most brilliant students; their association lasted from 1910 to 1938. In Europe, Reik conducted research and lectured at several psychoanalytic institutes before coming (1938) to the United States. He was naturalized in 1944. He founded (1948) the National Psychological Association for Psychoanalysis. Among his many writings are From Thirty Years with Freud (tr. 1940), Listening with the Third Ear (1948, repr. 1972), The Secret Self (1952), The Search Within (1956, repr. 1968), Of Love and Lust (1957, repr. 1970), Myth and Guilt (1957, repr. 1970), The Compulsion to Confess (1959, repr. 1972), Creation of Woman (1960), The Temptation (1961), Voices from the Inaudible (1964), Curiosities of the Self (1965), and The Many Faces of Sex (1966).

Bibliography

See the autobiographical Fragments of a Great Confession (1949, repr. 1965).

Reik, Theodor

(1888–1969) psychoanalyst; born in Vienna, Austria. He became a close friend and protégé of Sigmund Freud after they met in 1910. He took a Ph.D. in psychology from the University of Vienna, and after serving in the German army during World War I, he practiced as a psychoanalyst in Vienna (1918–28), where he participated in Freud's famous Wednesday evening meetings. After 1928 he taught at the Berlin Psychoanalytic Institute until 1933, when he fled the Nazis to The Hague, Holland. In 1938 he emigrated to the U.S.A. where he established a private practice in New York City. He became a U.S. citizen in 1944. In 1946 he established the National Psychological Association for Psychoanalysis when the American Psychoanalytic Association refused him full membership due to his not being a physician—even though Freud himself had written a famous essay in 1926, defending Reik's right to practice. Reik emphasized the role of intuition in a psychoanalyst's treatment and diverged from certain orthodox Freudian views, including the emphasis on the sexual nature of human beings, but maintained his friendship with Freud until the latter's death. His many works included Listening With the Third Ear (1948), Of Love and Lust (1957), and Curiosities of the Self (1965).
References in periodicals archive ?
Lublin's contribution consisted of a four-part drawing, each panel nearly the size of Gentileschi's original; an accompanying wall text; an essay for the catalogue discussing the function of perspective in painting; reproductions of a series of preparatory sketches; and the partial reprint of a 1957 book, Myth and Guilt, by psychoanalyst Theodor Reik.
Thus Freud's follower Theodor Reik, borrowing a phrase from Nietzsche's Beyond Good and Evil (Part VIII, p.
Theodor Reik reaches similar conclusions, claiming that "the male sex is more masochistic than the female.
After noting the four elements of masochism that Theodor Reik identifies--fantasy, suspense, demonstration, and provocation--Deleuze comments that "it is curious that Reik, no less than other analysts, neglects a fifth factor which is very important: the form of the contract in the masochistic relationship" (75).
Theodor Reik, a disciple of Sigmund Freud who settled in New York in the 1920s, remarked that life is often tragic and sad.
Theodor Reik contended that the jokes about shnorrers express the hope and conviction that the economic gap between the haves and the have nots will be erased one day.
Sights and sounds encountered on an Easter Sunday stroll through Munich (Bolivians singing and dancing, Siberians playing Bach) set the theme for Rinser's self-effacing self-portrait as a peripatetic pacifist and feminist freedom fighter who, like the psychoanalyst Theodor Reik, listens with the third (or inner) ear.
Judging from his footnotes, Jones's guiding experts on "masochism" have been Havelock Ellis, Richard von Krafft-Ebing and Theodor Reik, now partly or wholly superseded by recent scholarship.
As the noted psychoanalyst Theodor Reik once observed, "Work and love-- these are the basics.