Theodore I


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Theodore I

(Theodore Lascaris), d. 1222, Byzantine emperor of Nicaea (1204–22), son-in-law of the Byzantine emperor Alexius III. He escaped from Constantinople after it was captured (1204) by the Latins of the Fourth Crusade and founded a Byzantine state at Nicaea (see Nicaea, empire ofNicaea, empire of,
1204–61. In 1204 the armies of the Fourth Crusade set up the Latin Empire of Constantinople, but the Crusaders' influence did not extend over the entire Byzantine Empire.
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). Uniting nearly all of W Asia Minor except the Turkish sultanate of Iconium, he kept his state intact against Henry of Flanders, Latin emperor of Constantinople, and against the Seljuk Turks. He was succeeded by his son-in-law, John III.
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References in periodicals archive ?
In other words, Theodore is considering Christ's common prosopon to be the functional center of unity in a way analogous to how the human "ego" is not merely the mind and heart of one's unified existence but also the responsible cause of all of one's actions.
In the third example, it is important to note that when Theodore affirms that Christ can speak and act in dual ways, Theodore is careful to state that when Christ speaks and acts as man or as the Word, such individual acts ought not to be interpreted as applicable to both at the same time:
But just as Theodore is careful to preserve the true freedom of Christ's humanity in his union with the Word, he is also resolved fully to protect the integrity of the Word's divine nature and activity.
Theodore is ever insistent that becoming a child of God and a member of the Body of Christ through baptism and the nourishment of this life through the Eucharist are not wholly sufficient of themselves.
(7) Voste 250/179; Conti 115a ("a" and "b" refer here and throughout this study to the left and right columns on the page; I also note in square brackets the verse from John's Gospel that Theodore is commenting on, here 12:50).
"Part of the story of Theodore is about the struggle between sexuality and faith.
The real central problem for Theodore is not so much on the level of the unity of Christ's natures but on the kind of unity that has to exist between the Word's and the assumed man's free will.(26) He did not believe that Christ could be truly and fully human unless he was also acknowledged to have a human free will.
I turn now to an analogy that Theodore alludes to only in passing that exemplifies the union of the two natures in Christ, namely the union between the body and the soul.(68) To understand the point Theodore is making, we turn to a passage from Narsai that can help us.
So too Theodore is mindful of what can be asserted of the Word and of the assumed man.
But since Theodore is opposed to any form of divinization, which he saw to be an absorption into the divine nature, he did not understand the communion effected by the Eucharist to be a sharing in God's nature but a sharing in God's immortal and immutable life in a future state which Christ now enjoys.