Theophrastus


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Theophrastus

(thē'ōfrăs`təs) [Gr.,=divinely speaking], c.372–c.287 B.C., Greek philosopher, Aristotle's successor as head of the PeripateticsPeripatetics
[Gr.,=walking about; from Aristotle's manner in teaching], the followers of Aristotle. Theophrastus, friend of Aristotle and cofounder with him of the Peripatetic school of philosophy, succeeded him as its head (323 B.C.) and did much to bring it into favor.
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. The school flourished under his leadership. He wrote on many subjects, but his works on plants are perhaps the most important of his technical writings. His Characters, a series of sketches of various ethical types, provides a valuable picture of his time. It anticipates such studies as those by Sir Thomas Overbury, John Earle, and La Bruyère.
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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Theophrastus

 

(“possessor of divine speech”; real name, Tyrtamos). Born circa 372 B.C. in Eresus, Lesbos; died circa 287 B.C. in Athens. Greek philosopher and natural scientist. One of history’s earliest botanists.

Theophrastus studied first with Plato and then with Aristotle. He was the author of A Manual of Rhetoric, which has not been preserved, and of Characters, a collection of 30 short sketches of character types, such as the flatterer and the idle talker. Characters has served as a model for many modern moralists.

WORKS

Les Caractères. Edited by O. Navarre. Paris, 1952.
In Russian translation:
Issledovanie o rasteniiakh. Moscow, 1951.
In [Menander] Komedii [Herodas] Mimiamby. Moscow, 1964.

REFERENCE

Stroux, J. De Theophrasti virtutibus dicendi. Leipzig-Berlin, 1907.
The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

Theophrastus

?372--?287 bc, Greek Peripatetic philosopher, noted esp for his Characters, a collection of sketches of moral types
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
In French literature: La Bruyere, Les Caracteres ou les moeurs de ce siecle, first published 1688, "The Characters, or Manners of the Age." Second publication with the addition in 1699 of Les Caracteres de Theophraste traduits du grec ("The Characters of Theophrastus translated from the Greek").
and Richards, J.F.C., 1956, Theophrastus On Stones: Ohio State University Press, Columbus, Ohio, 238 p.
In the space of a paragraph he turns from the regretful acknowledgment of difference to an unabashedly savant discussion of Theophrastus and a translation of his Characters.
Fruitlessly consulting the classical botanists Pliny and Theophrastus, their Renaissance followers could not believe that maize was unknown to the Greeks and Romans.
In fact, the material's properties have been known since antiquity, and is mentioned in Theophrastus, Cato, Varro, Pliny the Elder, Columella, and Plutarch, classical authors who lived and wrote between the 4th century B.C.
(3) I defend these remarks about the media of olfactory and auditory experience and add an important qualification in my paper "Aristotle and Theophrastus on Sense-Perception through a Medium," Die Philosophie der Antike (forthcoming).
Philippus Aureolus Theophrastus Bombast von Hohenheim, who took the name Paracelsus when he was about 20 years old, was born in 1493.
Plinius Secundus (1601 and 1634).(4) In Of Education, Milton writes that after a student learns grammar and reads Aristotle and Theophrastus, 'The like accesse will be to Vitruvius, to Senecas naturall questions, to Mela, Celsus, Pliny, or Solinus'.
The Greek writer Theophrastus (1916) reported the maximum yield for wheat in Babylon as 100-fold over what was sown.
With that in mind, the Greek botanist Theophrastus bestowed the goddess's name on an extremely colorful group of flowers.
Hep!', a little-known essay from Eliot's last work, Impressions of Theophrastus Such, explaining the claims of Jews to an understanding of their history and aspirations, is a little odd); Eliza Lynn Linton, with her hysterically anti-feminist essay, 'The Girl of the Period'; and 'New Women' of the 1890s such as Mona Caird, Sarah Grand, and Vernon Lee.
Something similar is suggested by a passage of Theophrastus.(19) Here the less penetrating but allegedly more omnidirectional movements of lower-pitched notes are said to be paralleled by the reverberations of instruments equipped with a [GREEK TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] or a [GREEK TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] (a bronze bell), since these are [GREEK TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]; and if one touches the soundbox, or the `horn or arm' of an instrument ([GREEK TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] ...