cognitive dissonance

(redirected from Theory of cognitive dissonance)
Also found in: Dictionary, Medical.

cognitive dissonance

[¦käg·nəd·iv ′dīs·ən·əns]
(psychology)
Psychological conflict that results from incongruous beliefs and attitudes held simultaneously.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

cognitive dissonance

the experience of competing, opposing or contradictory thoughts, attitudes or actions leading to a feeling of tension and the need to achieve consonance. The term was introduced by Festinger (1957). In his definition dissonant cognitions exist when Belief A implies the negation of Belief B. For example, ‘Smoking causes lung cancer’ is dissonant with ‘I smoke’. The dissonance can be reduced in a variety of ways, either by adjusting Belief A or Belief B. Belief A could be adjusted by disregarding medical reports that confirm the belief and by paying particular attention to sceptical reports. Belief B can be adjusted by smoking less, or smoking tobacco of a low carcinogenic type.
Collins Dictionary of Sociology, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2000
References in periodicals archive ?
A theory of cognitive dissonance. Evanston, IL: Row, Peterson.
A theory of cognitive dissonance. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press.
A theory of cognitive dissonance. Stanford, CA : Stanford University Press.
(1957), A Theory of Cognitive Dissonance, Evanston, Ill: Row Peterson.
According to Festinger's (1957) theory of cognitive dissonance when subjects are induced to indulge in a behavior with little justification, their post- experimental attitudes usually involves cognitive dissonance state of mind.
This co-movement of voting on economic and other issues may come from a desire for party strength, or because individuals strive for consistency across opinions and from opinions to behaviors, as suggested by the psychological theory of cognitive dissonance. In two papers, I find support for the relevance of cognitive dissonance to the voting arena.
(1957), A Theory of Cognitive Dissonance, Stanford University Press, Stanford, CA.
I often refer to the theory of cognitive dissonance in my analysis of antisemitism.
When he commenced the project he decided to test the theory of cognitive dissonance. That is, if you behave in a certain way your beliefs will eventually change to conform to your behaviour.
(37) The well-established theory of cognitive dissonance (38) suggests that even if Perkins may have found his work initially repugnant or unethical, the years he spent toiling in those tainted fields more likely eased than tortured his conscience.

Full browser ?