special relativity

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Related to Theory of special relativity: Theory of General Relativity

special relativity

(rel-ă-tiv -ă-tee) See relativity, special theory.

special relativity

[′spesh·əl rel·ə′tiv·əd·ē]
(relativity)
The division of relativity theory which relates the observations of observers moving with constant relative velocities and postulates that natural laws are the same for all such observers.
References in periodicals archive ?
Newton had postulated that the force of gravity between two bodies emerged instantaneously but Einstein's Theory of Special Relativity had established that nothing, no signal and no effect, could move faster than the speed of light.
Einstein's theory of special relativity established a link between space and time.
As a result, his theory of special relativity was essentially complete as first set out.
As one of the first physicist to visit Einstein and respond to the theory of special relativity, their dialogues lasted until Einstein's decease.
According to the theory of special relativity, any particle that has mass may come close to but cannot quite reach the speed of light.
What inspires a mural like Leonardo's The Last Supper, a theory as iconoclastic as Einstein's theory of special relativity, a novel as exceptionally true to experience as Virginia Woolf's Mrs Dalloway?
Statements of the author's facts--"Time is not a factor in the microworld..." "We are not alone..." "The universe is a closed and integrated system of energy..."--are mixed with information like--the speed of light is 186000 mph and Einstein published his Theory of Special Relativity in 1905.
EINSTEIN'S theory of special relativity says a space ship would need an infinite amount of energy to hit 186,411 miles a second - the speed of light - a kind of intergalactic speed limit.
His first theory of special relativity in 1905 gave us E = mc2, which led to the atomic bomb and unlocked the secrets of the stars.
PARTS of Einstein's theory of special relativity are wrong, says a former Huddersfield University professor.
After following the traditional introductory road in opening chapters on vector calculus, electrostatics, the boundary-value problem, dielectrics, and electric energy, he takes "a sharp turn into the relativistic domain" by presenting chapters on he theory of special relativity, vector calculus in spacetime, and the relativistic understanding of Maxwell's equations.
1905 is known as his "annus mirabilis," or miraculous year, because he published a paper laying the groundwork for his most important contribution to physics, the Theory of Special Relativity. Best known by the formula E=[mc.sup.2], the theory explains an energy source for physical phenomena from stars to atomic bombs--although the pacifist Einstein did not see any practical applications for his formula.

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