structuration

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structuration

‘the structuring of social relations across time and space’ (GIDDENS, 1984) as the result of the interaction of pre-existing STRUCTURE and individual agency. See DUALITY OF STRUCTURE, STRUCTURATION THEORY, STRUCTURE AND AGENCY.
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In his theory of structuration, Giddens (1984) clarified several concepts such as structure, agents, actors, consciousness, rationalization, and motivations, including the wants and desires that prompt social actions.
(Eds) (1991) "Giddens' Theory of Structuration: A Critical Appreciation" Routledge.
Transcripts were read line by line and sections of text were coded using codes from Giddens' theory of structuration and the conceptual framework developed for this study.
Giddens' vantage point for the theory of structuration is to balance the constraining influence of structure over human action embedded in the established sociological framework.
For more than 20 years, Giddens' theory of structuration has been proposed as a useful means of conducting alternative management accounting research (see Baxter and Chua, 2003).
In 1984, Anthony Giddens proposed the theory of structuration to provide theoretical constructs with which to analyze social systems.
Recalling Giddens' (1979) theory of structuration, the adaptive structuration theory (AST) suggests that users of communication technology choose to adapt either a technology's role to the needs of the team, or to adapt the team's structure to employ the technology in an amicable and conducive way (DeSanctis & Poole, 1994; Cho & Lee, 2008; Timmerman & Scott, 2006).
The constitution of society: Outline of a theory of structuration. Cambridge, UK: Polity Press.
For some time I have been engaged in reflection upon the institutional character of the church, particularly in regard to Anthony Giddens's social theory of structuration. Giddens's work suggests that transformation will be an inevitable and essential element of mission-shaped presence, where the goal is either initiation or collaborative participation, or indeed both, as a consequence of the human 'actors' engaged with and by mission-shaped presence.
Sociological theory, in particular the theory of structuration articulated by Anthony Giddens, offers us a vocabulary and conceptual framework within which we might contextualize this duality raised by Butler's notion of performativity, suggesting how we might better understand the interrelationships between individuals who "make decisions and take action; and the social systems that enable and constrain them" (Messer-Davidow 290).
See also from Giddens, The Constitution of Society: Outline of the Theory of Structuration (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1984); and Conversations with Anthony Giddens: Making Sense of Modernity (Stanford CA: Stanford University Press, 1998).

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