thermae


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thermae:

see bathsbaths,
in architecture. Ritual bathing is traceable to ancient Egypt, to prehistoric cities of the Indus River valley, and to the early Aegean civilizations. Remains of bathing apartments dating from the Minoan period exist in the palaces at Knossos and Tiryns.
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Thermae

Ancient Roman buildings for public baths, which also incorporated places for sports, discussions, and reading.

Thermae

 

public baths in ancient Rome that served also as social, entertainment, and sports centers. The thermae had assumed their basic architectural form by the second century B.C., during the republican period, and became fully developed under the empire. Most consisted of an intricate complex of buildings, each of which was divided into numerous chambers. The main building usually followed a symmetrical plan. The frigidarium (cold room), tepidarium (warm room), and calidarium (hot room) were placed along the building’s major axis and were flanked on either side by a vestibule, a dressing room, bathing rooms, rooms for massage, and steam rooms. There was also an exercise court. (Some provincial thermae, in contrast, lacked this symmetrical scheme.)

The immense inner rooms featured domes and huge barrel or groin vaults; the main building, for example, of the Baths of Car-acalla in Rome (early third century A.D.) measured 216 m by 112 m and had a dome 35 m in diameter. The inner rooms were lavishly adorned with mosaic, paintings, sculpture, and other works of art.

The thermae were heated with hot air that circulated in conduits usually built under the floors or in the walls. Often water from hot springs was used. There were also private thermae.

REFERENCE

Cameron, C. Termy rimlian. Moscow, 1939. (Translated from English.)

bath

1. An open tub used as a fixture for bathing.
2. The room containing the bathtub.
3. (pl.) The Roman public bathing establishments, consisting of hot, warm, and cool plunges, sweat rooms, athletic and other facilities; balnea, thermae.
References in periodicals archive ?
Deriving from the Greek word 'heat', thermae bathing is a detoxifying treatment dating back to ancient Roman life and involves a series of heat rooms progressively increasing in temperature tempered with cooling hydro showers or ice shaving.
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The new Thermae Bath Spa (home of Britain's only natural thermal waters J offers head-to-toe treatments.
In Tuscany, Italy though, heaven goes by the name Adler Thermae. This luxurious spa and wellness resort, nestled within Italy's Orcia Valley by the thermal baths of Bagno Vignoni, is undeniably divine.
As in the elegant, atmospheric spy novels of Alan Furst, most of which also play out in places belonging both to East and West, there is history here, ancient and recent, emanating from places as disparate as the Thermae of Caracalla (trivialized in our time by the Three Tenors concert) and the ruins of Grozny (forgotten, now that Putin is our ally).
The same promise is made by Italian company Ischia Thermae, which has launched Thermal Mud Shampoo said to be particularly suitable for fine and fragile hair.
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Thermae bath spa water supply cleaning in place and water sample collection operations
Our hotel for the week was the luxurious Hotel Caesius Thermae & Spa Resort, set within lush gardens on the border of Bardolino and Cisano.
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According to a press release of the Japanese embassy, two Japanese films 'A Tale of Samurai Cooking'and 'Thermae Romae' with their English sub-titles were showcased.