Thermal bridging

Thermal bridging

Heat flow that occurs across more conductive components in an otherwise well-insulated material, resulting in disproportionately significant heat loss. For example, steel studs in an insulated wall dramatically reduce the overall energy performance of the wall, because of thermal bridging through the steel.
References in periodicals archive ?
Developed in Europe in the 1950s, EIFSs are defined as non-load bearing cladding systems that provide exterior walls with versatile, insulated, and finished surfaces, while offering excellent thermal performance to eliminate thermal bridging.
Thermal bridging is a common problem in exterior wall systems when parts of the wall aren't insulated or there is a change in materials or systems that transfer heat differently, explains David T.
56; in contrast to conventional precast/prestressed wall panels, its absence of solid sections eliminates potential thermal bridging and bowing.
The structural girts inside the assembly were offset to minimize thermal bridging, and thermal bridging was modeled using the same heat transfer software (Figure 4).
Even the windows contribute to sustainability and resilience--the durable vinyl frames contain plastic foam insulation and numerous air pockets that help prevent thermal bridging (the transfer of heat through materials).
The code requires that wood-framed walls in climate zones 6 to 8 have both insulation in the wall cavity and "continuous insulation," which is uninterrupted by the thermal bridging of the studs.
Thermal bridging in buildings can contribute to a multitude of problems, including, but not limited to, added energy use during heating and cooling seasons and interior surface condensation problems.
The solid walls received special attention to solve an energy-wasting thermal bridging problem.