thermal conductivity

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thermal conductivity

[′thər·məl ‚kan‚dək′tiv·əd·ē]
(thermodynamics)
The heat flow across a surface per unit area per unit time, divided by the negative of the rate of change of temperature with distance in a direction perpendicular to the surface. Also known as coefficient of conductivity; heat conductivity.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

thermal conductivity

The rate of transfer of heat by conduction; the amount of heat per unit of time per unit area that is conducted through a slab of unit thickness of a material if the difference in temperature between opposite faces is one degree of temperature; a property of the material itself, usually represented by the letter k and called k factor.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
where [[lambda].sub.c], [[lambda].sub.m], and [[lambda].sub.f] are the thermal conductivities of the composite, matrix, and filler, respectively, and [[PHI].sub.f] is the volume fraction of filler.
In this study, the measured thermal conductivities of several polyolefin composites separately filled with two thermal conductive particles are quoted from literature to preliminarily verify this thermal conductivity equation, such as medium density polyethylene composites, polypropylene composites, and epoxy composites.
The thermal conductivities of Ordos sandstone has a linear relationship with the moisture content (Fig.
Effective Viscosities and Thermal Conductivities of Aqueous Nanofluids Containing Low Volume Concentrations of Al2O3 Nanoparticles." International Journal of Heat and Mass Transfer 51: 26516(2008)
Furthermore, the thermal conductivities of the composites are 209, 257, and 348 W/m x K for 3 at % W, Mo, and Ti additions, respectively.
Adjusted thermal conductivities for premium materials are shown in TABLE 1.
In this part, we use the IIM method to solve the problem of effective thermal conductivity estimation of geomaterials whose constituent thermal conductivities depend on temperature.
Thermal conductivities decrease practically in all ranges of densities, including specimen densification.
The effect on thermal conductivities caused by various material physical properties, like thickness, density and methods of installation were evaluated on the test apparatus, which was based on a 3 inches (76.2 mm) heating pipe, with three heating circuits controlled for the metering area and end guards.
However, vertical BHE systems are often installed in the ground of multiple dipping layers (of rock or soil) with different thermal conductivities. The effective thermal conductivity for stratified media is identified with average thermal conductivity.
The measurement of thermal conductivities requires specialized instrumentation, but calculation works well for solid coatings and solventborne liquid paints.