infrared spectrum

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infrared spectrum

[¦in·frə¦red ¦spek·trəm]
(electromagnetism)
The range of wavelengths of infrared radiation.
A display or graph of the intensity of infrared radiation emitted or absorbed by a material as a function of wavelength or some related parameter.
References in periodicals archive ?
Discounting problems with the law of emission [3,4], it can be said that the gaseous models have been based on a false premise: that the thermal spectrum of the Sun could be generated using a vast combination of non-thermal processes [7].
They do not imply that the objects which are the subject of these proofnecessarily display a perfect thermal spectrum. The proofs are invoked when the spectrum is continuous and when an object's emissivity is most simply accounted for by invoking condensed matter.
Local thermal equilibrium has come to cloud the requirements for producing a thermal spectrum and mask the need for condensed matter [30].
Accordingly, the thermal spectrum itself should be regarded as one of the strongest proof that the Sun is condensed matter, as its generation requires a lattice which dictates the interatomic spacing of condensed matter.
Within each solar layer, a new perfect mixture must exist in order that its absorptive characteristics enable the production of a new shifted thermal spectrum.
An analysis of the hydrogen bonding system within water helps to explain how the oceans of the Earth could produce a thermal spectrum with an apparent temperature much lower than their physical temperature [15, 16].
Assuming frequency independent scattering, a perfect thermal spectrum should have been received, even on Earth.