absolute temperature

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Related to Thermodynamic temperature: luminous intensity, thermodynamic temperature scale

absolute temperature

[′ab·sə‚lüt ′tem·prə·chür]
(thermodynamics)
The temperature measurable in theory on the thermodynamic temperature scale.
The temperature in Celsius degrees relative to the absolute zero at -273.16°C (the Kelvin scale) or in Fahrenheit degrees relative to the absolute zero at -459.69°F (the Rankine scale).
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

absolute temperature

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The temperature value relative to absolute zero. The absolute zero is the theoretical temperature at which molecular motion vanishes and a body would have no heat energy; the zero point of the Kelvin and Rankine temperature scales. Absolute zero may be interpreted as the temperature at which the volume of a perfect gas vanishes or, more generally, as the temperature of the cold source that would render a Carnot cycle 100% efficient. The value of absolute zero is now estimated to be −273.15°C, −459.67°F, 0 K, and 0°R.
An Illustrated Dictionary of Aviation Copyright © 2005 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
References in periodicals archive ?
The equation of motion, heat transport equation, and relation between conductive temperature and thermodynamic temperature can be written as
To get the solution for strain (e), thermal displacement component (w), conductive temperature ([phi]), thermodynamic temperature ([theta]), and thermal stress ([[sigma].sub.xx]) in the space time domain we have applied Laplace inversion formula to (65), (67), (68), (69), and (70), respectively, which have been done numerically using a method based on Fourier series expansion technique [32].
From these figures it is clear that magnitude of all the quantities, that is, thermodynamic temperature [theta], conductive temperature [phi], displacement u, stress component [sigma], and strain component e, is greater for smaller magnitude of [K.sub.1].
Figures 6-9 show that the magnitude of thermodynamic temperature [theta], conductive temperature [phi], displacement component u, and stress component [sigma] has greater value for smaller magnitude of [xi].
The kelvin, symbol K, is the unit of thermodynamic temperature; its magnitude is set by fixing the numerical value of the triple point of water to be equal to exactly 273.16 when it is expressed in the SI unit K.
One such set is time, length, energy, charge, thermodynamic temperature, amount of substance, and luminous intensity with units s, m, J, C, K, mol, and cd.
where T and P are the thermodynamic temperature and pressure; [T.sup.*] and [P.sup.*] are the characteristic (hard-core) parameters for a given material.
Measures of temperature that are defined to be consistent with the laws of thermodynamics are said to be thermodynamic temperatures. Thermodynamic temperatures, however, are very difficult to measure precisely and accurately Consequently, internationally-agreed scales of temper tare, with temperatures on the scale as close to thermodynamic temperatures as possible at the time the scales are approved, are used to approximate the thermodynamic temperature.
Ultimately all physical properties should be referable to thermodynamic temperature. Thermodynamic temperatures can be accurately determined by:
The International Temperature Scales that followed the NHS were based on fixed points with assigned temperature values based on measurements of the thermodynamic temperature, standard thermometers and interpolation equations.
The Kelvin Thermodynamic Temperature Scale (KTTS) is defined by assigning 273.16 K to the [H.sub.2]O TP, making the kelvin equal to 1/273.16 of the [H.sub.2]O TP temperature.
4.1 Thermodynamic Temperature Measurements Utilizing Ideal Gases